hindu americans

When I picture Hanuman it is often in depictions of his physical prowess and accomplishment, in flight usually, with the
Hindu American Community Services Inc. (HACSI) is a relatively new organization, having started seven years ago as an independent
Last weekend, the Hindu Republican Coalition hosted a rally for Republican Presidential Nominee Donald Trump in Edison, New Jersey. The rally, called "Hindus United Against Terror Charity Concert," featured Indian Bollywood stars and was advertised as a charity concert for terror victims.
For the past 15 months, Donald Trump has run one of the most prejudiced and polarizing campaigns in modern American history
The SAFG, and submissions endorsing their edits, are motivated by ideology and ignorance in insisting on erasing India and linking Hindu scripture with caste-based discrimination. And as the social media posts above show, rather than increasing understanding, they normalize Hinduphobia.
This brings me to the idea of social justice, which I think gets thrown around too loosely. To me, one of the great tragedies
Highly respected professors face intimidation, threats and smear campaigns for deviating from the views of the Hindu right. A cultural and religious war is raging in which Western academics are the enemy.
The debate over how India is to appear in California textbooks has to be seen against the backdrop, not only of Indian political action committees, of what is emerging as a pattern of influence exerted by Hindu nationalist groups here in the U.S. upon U.S. education.
Maybe it's my lack of knowledge or an absence of resources, but I don't think I've explicitly ever been told how I, as a 10 year old, 15 year old, and now 21 year old, could interpret the depths of my religion and piece it together for my daily life.
If you are a teacher, school official, or perhaps even a student or parent in California, you have probably heard about the controversy that has raged for a decade about how India and Hinduism are depicted in California's History lessons.
What has transpired in Flint over the past few months has come as a shock for even those who have remained steadfastly optimistic that the city can come back.
As we celebrate Black History Month and remember the ongoing struggle for civil and human rights, one of the most striking lessons from history is that movements for social change never go smoothly.
On the other hand, Hindu Americans look at me suspiciously and nod their heads in disbelief. They automatically perceive
"Sanjay's Super Team" is a fascinating look at culture and religion in second generation Indian families.
One would not think that an open letter to Silicon Valley tech leaders from eminent scholars of South Asia would cause a huge public uproar spanning two continents. But indeed it has created a tidal wave of incensed reaction from the wider Hindu nationalist movement in India.
Why is this important to emphasize? Simply put, many Hindus -- regardless of their background -- are put in positions of trying to explain India, even if they have minimal connection to or interest in the country. They are also wrongly assumed to be the spokespeople for India, particularly its social and economic issues.
Even if it seems commercialized and narcissistic at times, the yoga culture one sees today has not only an individual health and beauty element but a far more promising social-spiritual one.
According to Pew, Hinduism is now tied with Buddhism as the country's fourth-largest religion, with approximately 2.23 million adherents. What's fascinating is that, according to the survey, the population of Hindus in the U.S. jumped by over 1 million since the last time Pew collected the data, which led to the research center's acknowledging of a potential undercount last time.