historically black universities

South Carolina State University will find it nearly impossible to recover from Tuesday's vote by the South Carolina House Ways and Means Subcommittee to close the university for one year while all leadership and students are swept out of its doors.
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And as the nation scrambles to match the intellectual capacity of nations in the Middle and Far East for economic and national security interests, the tenor of the nation's conversation towards HBCUs has changed.
Historically, black colleges were created for those who had no access to higher education. But after 50+ years of school desegregation, are they still needed? Nancy Redd is joined by guests Jarret Carter and David Johns to discuss.
It's a collaboration examined in the National Museum of American Jewish History’s exhibition, "Beyond Swastika and Jim Crow
Popular culture, whether driven by intimate influences or external ones, has everything to do with where a black student chooses to go to school. There's no bad choice.
In more recent years, budget cuts, aging buildings and failing infrastructures have undercut the once vital role many HBCUs played in educating and uplifting the Black community.
Put aside the fact that the black experts and leaders are disproportionately HBCU graduates; there is still the hypocrisy of expecting black students to make the choice for diversity when the same expectation is not present for white students.