holiday depression

If you’re feeling gloomy about the holiday season, Martha Beck has some illuminating advice.
Recognizing that isolation, depression, and anxiety -- if unaddressed -- create a downward spiral of health that exacts a financial and human toll, we must continue to create services for the homebound elderly that address their mental as well as physical needs.
I realized that having a spouse or a child is not the thing that makes a person a grown-up; putting other people's needs ahead of your own is. And that impulse has nothing to do with your relationship status or whether or not you're the official host of the event.
Above all, save some time just to be alone. Actually by yourself. Actually doing nothing but the most important thing, reflecting on your life. Late at night, open the door, go out in the cold, look up--and be surprised at what you find coming to you upon the midnight clear.
With Thanksgiving just behind us, we are fully immersed in the holiday season. Messages of gratitude, togetherness and family are in abundance. While they outwardly communicate positive themes, they can be overwhelming for some as much as it is joyous for others.
How do we cope with what some call "the holiday blues"? Perhaps one key to keeping the holidays in balance and in proper perspective is to appeal to our faith, which obviously is where the holidays were meant to be focused in the first place.
If I seem to be quoting the Dalai Lama lately, it's because I'm writing about kindness and his wisdom expresses it so clearly
If all the holiday displays of red and green have left you feeling bluer than blue, take heart because you are not alone. While no formal studies have been conducted on the incidence of the "holiday blues," a mental health expert I recently talked to was quick to say it is not an unusual occurrence.
Children and teens retain pictures of holidays past before the family transition--their home is symbolic of loving times, security, safety and what they have known. Everything is different now and unlike the sugar cookie recipe from generations past, there are no known ingredients for handling the holidays, especially when it is a "first" for a family in transition.
It's a universally meaningful time for millions of people, and I would argue that this sense of connectedness is a large part of what makes the season seem sort of magical. Yet for many people, the winter months don't always live up to their heartwarming reputation.
The world is in a tough place right now, and many people are suffering. You may be suffering too, and while what you are dealing with is difficult, I think there's also an opportunity there.
I want to tell you all a story, and I'm going to tell you that at first is a bummer, but that is not my intention. Stick with me on this, and I think that it will encourage you. It's just that my history is not that bright around the holiday season, but that is changing for the better.
The first year, I didn't cook Thanksgiving dinner or shop for Christmas presents. I had other children, sure. But I didn't have Emma, and that defined me
It was the first holiday in over a decade that I did not go to bed filled with a sense of longing for a "real" holiday. Making my own agenda and celebrating with likeminded people made the day much more gratifying.
The holiday season can be for many people... let's just say: fraught. Maybe your life hasn't gone the way you imagined. Maybe you'd planned to spend Christmas Eve with a spouse, fireside, toasting to the future over your grandmother's secret egg nog recipe.
Instead of just ignoring cuffing season and suffering through, or, even worse, responding to one of those "Hey girl" texts from your college boyfriend or the guy you saw at your high school reunion who you know it didn't work out with before, here are some ways to survive cuffing season with your heart and your morale intact.
No matter what is causing our "winter blues," it is important to stay on our own side and have faith that these moods can and will pass. To fight these battles, we must believe in our own resilience, in our ability to tolerate pain and to overcome the inevitable hurdles life brings.
Christmas, Hanukkah, New Year's -- these are supposed to be times of celebration, togetherness, and happiness. Yet, they can bring challenges to our physical and emotional health. Here are eight tips for staying healthy and happy during this season of joy.
Here are a few holiday scenarios people commonly find themselves grappling with when they are dealing with the loss of a loved one at the holidays, and some ways to address them.