hollande

In the Grande-Synthe camp outside of Dunkirk in Northern France, aid workers are trying to help the 3,000 refugees stranded there amidst wet, cold and unsanitary conditions until a more permanent camp is built.
Now that the handshakes, back slapping and self-congratulatory addresses are over, the cold hard reality of what wasn't achieved at the Paris Climate Change Conference is setting in.
Francois Hollande is a highly unpopular president. Could he be tempted to turn these measures to his own political purposes? He has said they are vital to his war against terrorism. Sounds just like George W. Bush. Who will declare when that war on terror is over?
The French president vowed to ensure the country's safety, but didn't back away from plans to take in refugees.
Even if the French wholeheartedly embraced this plan, it's not going to happen overnight. And a lot of brave soldiers are going to die in the effort -- there is no getting around that. Whether this price is politically acceptable is up to the French people, really. It's for them to decide.
France is ready to take in 24,000 refugees as part of European Union plans to welcome more than 100,000 in the next two years
The French have been reading the tea leaves. Despite or perhaps because of recent violence, there seemed a new spirit of generosity towards tourists, if not to migrants. So many Americans are trooping off to art fairs. Why not also visit the most exciting performance festivals, many in France, which have a multicultural, often political, contemporary perspective? And a spate of private, hidden-away sites has also opened to the public which document the intensity of the lives and work of artists.
If our president is an appeaser, however, then so are all our allies who participated in crafting and agreeing to this deal with Iran.
Hollande met for an hour with retired Cuban leader Fidel Castro, 88, whose 1959 revolution is generally well regarded in