Holocaust Museum

"While recognizing that security concerns must be fully addressed, we should not turn our backs on the thousands of legitimate refugees."
In 1924, Adolf Hitler described propaganda as "a terrible weapon in the hands of an expert." For two decades, the Nazis showed the world what a devastating weapon it could be.
Every man, woman and child has a story. For some it is found in the most unlikely of places, during one of the most horrific of times, where actions of a few meant life versus death. Mine is a story of survival: my own and my family's.
The 43-year-old Stringfellow, who has a Master's degree in military history, is most interested in conveying to his students
Joe Brodecki was the executive director of the Campaign to Remember, the fundraising initiative for the development of the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum.
Soon no more Holocaust survivors will be alive, and our duty of remembering and understanding increases. This means, among other things, that we must face the uncomfortable truths about human nature that Auschwitz symbolizes.
If "Never Again" means that the world will mobilize to stop mass atrocities -- genocide, torture, ethnic cleansing, war crimes, and crimes against humanity -- then the integration of an exhibit at the U.S. Holocaust Memorial Museum showing ongoing crimes in Syria that rise to that level belies our commitment to such a slogan.
The 425-page, handwritten diary once belonged to Alfred Rosenberg, an important Nazi ideologue who spoke out about the Aryan
But he is optimistic that his words and those of other survivors will resonate long after he is gone. "I probably wouldn't
Researchers from the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum have concluded that over 40,000 Nazi camps and ghettos existed, far larger than previously believed. Geoffry Megargee and Dr. Martin Dean join Abby to discuss.