Holodomor

Finally, a film will be released in the new year that portrays Stalin's monstrous policies and how they brought about The Great Famine of 1933, known in Ukrainian as the Holodomor (death by starvation).
Though World War II has long since concluded, the conflict still lives on for many in Ukraine and the country's foreign Diaspora. For Kiev, which has been locked in a deadly stalemate with Russian-backed separatists in eastern Ukraine, the public relations stakes are high.
The Paleo Diet has finally been knocked from its perch as the stupidest food trend of the twenty-first century, replaced by an even stranger phenomenon: the Russian government's mass, televised destruction of banned imported food.
Even as the conflict with Russian-backed separatists smolders, Kiev has ratcheted up a no less ferocious PR war. Hoping to bolster its case against Moscow, Ukraine as well as the country's foreign Diaspora have zeroed in on the Stalinist-induced famine of 1932-33.
This is Canada. There is something phenomenally Canadian about our politicians who do the business of governance and manage to find time to connect with every imaginable community in this crazy multicultural land of ours.
When the instruments of death fly above us, we still look up in admiration, not horror. As long as we celebrate destruction in this way, we will be doomed to repeat it.
The problem with history is twofold: it tends to repeat itself, yet we never learn from it. On Sunday, we commemorated the greatest tragedy suffered by the Ukrainian people -- Holodomor of 1932-1933, a term that can be translated as "extermination by hunger."