Holy War

As I listen to the seemingly ceaseless, virtual shouting about diet and health these days, much of it self-serving, and little
Critics who claim that Muslims are more prone to religious extremism and violence have either forgotten or consciously ignore the West's own dark history of genocide. Christopher Columbus is not someone to be honored.
By far the greatest threat to international security is the ideological terrorism of Daesh and its ilk, backed by extremist clerics who continue to order the masses to "give all moral, material, political and military" support to what they consider "holy war" in Syria.
There are strong arguments making the case for the persistence (and indeed the intensification) of U.S. airstrikes against ISIS targets. But equally there are strong arguments, less frequently heard perhaps, for why the United States should not continue, and should certainly not intensify, those airstrikes.
The faith community must remind the world that evil can be overcome, and that individuals involved in evil systems and practices can be redeemed. But how to overcome evil is a very complicated theological question, which requires much self-reflection. In trying to figure out how to overcome evil, it is often helpful to first decide how not to.
Crusades "in general" refer to what are called "holy wars" or "just wars"--military campaigns for the purpose of halting the spread of non-Christian religions, of retaking holy places, or of conquering pagan areas.
Dr. Erin Saltman joins HuffPost Live to talk about the women of ISIS.
There are a number of things in the Bible that should trouble any reader. We find in its pages things like genocide, gang rape, and slavery -- not only being sanctioned, but at times even being commanded.
We will need to demonstrate that there are viable nonviolent means of dealing with societal problems--ways that are not only effective, but in fact more effective than violence is at resolving conflict, and keeping us safe as a society.
The Utes appear balanced overall, ranking #50 offensively and #54 defensively, but that's a little misleading. Utah remains among the better teams in the country at stopping the run. That's very important to note as BYU runs the ball 64.1 percent of the time.