homicides

CROSS THE LINE is published by Little, Brown and Company. It contains 400 pages and sells for $29.00. Book Review - Jackie
The remorseless killer called his victim a “piece of trash," police said.
The mayor is announcing a task force to reduce domestic abuse in the city.
Despite #3 being the only item we can actually impact, the answer is always, inevitably, dumbfoundingly, more guns. Thus
Conservative pundit Heather MacDonald is on a one-woman crusade to prove a war on cops that doesn't exist, while grossly exaggerating crime upticks in a handful of cities as a new crime wave.
Numerous cities have seen a spike in homicides this year.
By relying solely on non-experts as sources of information, the media wittingly or unwittingly reinforces misconceptions about domestic homicides. Domestic homicides sometimes provide experts with the opportunity to call attention to the underlying realities -- but only when the media thinks to call us.
Quite clearly, certainly in the Americas but also most of the world, firearms should be the principal focus for those attempting to curb violence through better safety, regulation and control of its 'tools'.
It seems clear that the Hernández administration is intending to exert some control over the information that is publicized regarding Honduras' homicide rates, particularly as it is reported in the international press.
Maybe I've got it all mixed up, but I haven't seen any interviews with guys in prison who pulled out a gun and shot someone because it was the "only" way they could settle an argument on favorable terms.
Think about it... 75.1 would allow the Nationalists to boast that they succeeded in lowering the homicide rate to what it was prior to the Lobo years. Clever, but it really is more likely that the Observatory's number is the more accurate one.
The problem of drug trafficking in Honduras appears to be on the decline, at least if you take the word of Arturo Corrales, the country's so-called "Super-Minister" of Defense and security.
The question is, "Will Hondurans really be safer with thousands of military police walking around armed to the teeth?" Given the history of the military in Honduras and other Latin American countries, it is right to be worried about the answer.
My friends tease me, telling me I have to relax. But the truth is that we never know when these things might happen, and it's better to be prepared for the worst should the unwanted ever unfold.
The heartrending massacre of 20 6- and 7-year-old children and six educators in Newtown, Conn., has galvanized public attention once again after a mass shooting. But the killing of children by gun violence is not new. In 2013, as we prepare to celebrate Martin Luther King's birthday and the 50th anniversary of the March on Washington and the dream of our gun-slain prophet of nonviolence, let us truly hear and follow rather than just celebrate him. Now is the time to free ourselves from the plague of gun violence which has taken over 1.3 million American lives since Dr. King and Robert Kennedy's assassinations in 1968. This is twice the loss of life than all American battle casualties in all the major wars we have fought since our nation began.