horrible bosses

Be kind Poor management can trigger an onslaught of gossip, sarcasm, and putdowns. And it is probably leaving you exhausted
Millennial business coach and content marketer Ryan Robinson noticed that neither his old boss nor his dad were "quick to dish out praise"-- even when he did great work. Their approval was, in consequence, "very meaningful" to Robinson.
And that's because there's a fundamental disconnect between the intention of MBWA and the way it's perceived by employees
Giving negative feedback to your boss is a delicate art. We all feel the need to give feedback to a superior now and again, but many of us shy away from it because we don't want to rock the boat.
When your boss asks you to do something for him, you could say, "I'll think about it." When your boss asks you to do something
Given that bad bosses are the most common cause of unhappiness at work and given the negative effects they have on employees and on the company's results, we clearly need to do something about this problem.
Think of the worst manager you have ever had. She probably hoarded all the knowledge for herself and refused to support you. She was a sealed box, unable to help others grow. She made decisions based on what was best for her, not for the company. Do you recognize this person?
Got a bad boss? The good news is you're not alone. Up to 65 million Americans have been impacted by bullying in the workplace at some point -- and most of the time the boss is to blame. The bad news is you still need to show up to work every morning and survive (at the very least). What's a girl to do?
File papers: check. Develop marketing plan: check. Get baby from doctor and drop off prescription medication at pharmacy...check? Everyone needs additional help from time to time, including your boss. But how much is too much when it comes to asking a favor from an employee?
Just about everyone gets a bad boss sooner or later. At my age, I've been through several. My motto has always been, 'Just Outlast the Bastard.' For the most part, that mantra has worked. But now I also do something else.
When you possess leadership integrity, people trust your decisions. They understand you have a vision, and because of your positive influence they take ownership in the plan, the process and the product.
Does this sound like your morning? If so, you may want to think about whether you could be a BFH.
Cruel leaders inspire hatred, not love, precisely because they are completely focused on themselves and use others to get what they want. They take what could be a great opportunity to inspire others to be great, and they squander it by being ruthless.
How many of us can relate to the movie Office Space and the infamous boss Bill Lumbergh? Most people would say that they can easily point to a boss that they currently have or have had who could have served as a role model for the movie character.
Rude, abrasive and downright hostile people are a fact of life. We have no choice in that. The choice we do have is how we handle them -- by not letting their problems feed our own.
Return the grocery cart. Don't hide behind a computer and hate. Help the elderly, the blind, the homeless and the MOMS. Don't
The boss is not always right, but he or she is always the boss. You'll be a more productive marketer if you don't try to second-guess them and instead try to wait out their bad moods and counterproductive methods.
Lynn Taylor joins HuffPost Live to explain how to deal with a horrible boss.
Managers from hell cost the U.S. $450 billion to $550 billion per year, according to a Gallup poll. This results from employees being disengaged. Out of 100 million full-time employees in the U.S., 70 million are actively disengaged and not inspired. Furthermore, over 2.5 million workers quit their jobs in June 2014, and the trend is increasing.
Well, this got out of hand fast. Jennifer Aniston's "Horrible Bosses 2" character is known to wear some provocative outfits