Housing and Urban Development

Elizabeth Warren grilled Ben Carson and called him out for his "unwillingness" to do his job.
Secretary of Housing & Urban Development Ben Carson finally answers questions from the House Appropriations Committee about the infamous $31,000 dining set purchase.
Ben Carson said he wasn't aware of the $31,000 price tag for his office dining set, but emails tell a different story.
The Tenement Museum offers a series of tours to curious patrons.
President-elect Donald Trump has nominated Dr. Ben Carson to be the next Secretary of Housing and Urban Development (HUD
"C'mon people, follow me here," Trump implored them, "the job has the word urban in it, he's an urban. You know, an URBAN
"The promise of suburbia -- to live in nature amid the easy flow of cars -- has been betrayed. Sprawl is not sustainable; its growth chokes on itself," argued architect and urban planner Andrés Duany at the Congress for New Urbanism in Detroit.
NLIHC enthusiastically supports this bold new bill because it tackles the unacceptably high levels of homelessness in this country and will increase the supply of affordable housing for the country's lowest income households.
Connecticut Governor Dannel Malloy gave us a taste today of what can be achieved when good government works closely with caring and motivated constituents -- the end of veteran homelessness in his state.
After attending a presentation on the history of housing segregation and race, parent Wendy Jacobson decided to see what her son's AP history textbook had to say on the matter.
We need elected officials to wake up to the affordable housing crisis and the importance of ensuring that people have housing with access to quality schools and quality healthcare, jobs and transportation.
The holidays hit homeless youth hard. Everywhere they look, people are spending money, showing loved ones how much they care, heading home for big feasts. If you're a kid with no money, no loved ones, and no home, the songs piped into every store can sting.
The only thing in our way is the old paradigm of government and property owners, that do not consider time investment as an important factor for development.
Today, we are delighted to see the U.S Department of Housing and Urban Development take a big step toward meeting our call for fairness.
With policymakers providing the needed funds, state and local housing agencies are restoring many of the housing vouchers lost to the sequestration cuts in recent years. But restoring the rest -- which the President and Congress should prioritize in their fall negotiations over a final 2016 budget -- will likely require relief from sequestration.
This program is more vital than ever as the need for affordable housing for seniors is growing exponentially. Yet, inexplicably, our leaders in Washington are de-prioritizing efforts to protect seniors by denying essential funding to HUD 202.
If we are to make equal opportunity real for every American, we must ensure that all citizens -- no matter their income or zip code -- have a fair shot to pursue their dreams.
The Trust Fund is not the panacea. It will go a very long way, providing funds for bricks and mortar, creating more affordable housing for thousands of Americans, but the operational and service side so vital to affordable housing will continue to rely on other federal programs.
As the Babes in the Woods story signifies, asking for assistance from those who can't or won't help, too often leads to desperate action. Recovery takes time and effort.
Not only is supportive housing a game changer when it comes to individual success, it is a more cost-effective use of taxpayer dollars. Inexplicably, however, the federal programs used to bolster supportive housing and save money are in a state of limbo, placing at risk the gains we have realized to date.