housing bubble

Out on the town I'm always asked a few questions about real estate, mostly "How's the market?" It's the follow-up question
"It happens more often than you think," Kim said afterward. "It's those red-light cameras. Since they were installed, there
Clinton's campaign released an ad with audio Trump recorded in 2006 in which he spoke of a "bubble burst" that he "sort of hope... happens."
The Federal Reserve is essential. But which tools it should use is up for debate.
After months of seemingly becoming overheated, the nation's housing markets are now showing welcome signs of leveling off, which should remove warnings of possible hard landings in some cities.
It is no longer a matter of if but when, and to what extent, we will see a downward pricing event in Dallas, Denver and Houston.
There are rules for issuing and securitizing mortgages. These rules were completely ignored in the peak years of the housing bubble. At every step, there were people who knew they were not following the law, but thought it would not matter.
Whether they should they rent or buy a home is one of the toughest financial decisions Americans face. The factors at play in making this decision revolve around not only where you are, but also who you are.
The financial markets have been through some wild and crazy times over the last two weeks, although it appears that they have finally stabilized. The net effect of all the gyrations is that a serious bubble in China's market seems to have been at least partially deflated. After hugely overreacting to this correction, most other markets have largely recovered. Prices are down from recent peaks, but in nearly all cases well above year-ago levels. But the stock market is really a sideshow; after all, back in 1987 the U.S. market fell by almost 25 percent for no obvious reason, with little noticeable effect on the U.S. economy. The more serious question is what is happening with the underlying economy, and there are some real issues here.
If we do nothing to create meaningful reform, the black homeowners of 2031 will have just 22 percent of the wealth of their white counterparts. That's a larger gap than before the housing bubble burst of 2008. This is not merely a concern; it's an impending crisis.