housing policy

Home & Living
For most of this election season, we were hoping that the candidates and at least one debate question touched on something
Impact
Regardless of who wins in November, Congress and the next administration must act boldly to help the 11 million housing insecure households who pay more than half of their incomes on rent. They often face difficult choices between paying rent and buying groceries or seeing a doctor. In the worst cases, they become homeless.
Politics
The ability to find housing is critical for successful re-entry into society.
Politics
The nation needs its housing assistance programs to be as efficient and effective as possible, and this legislation -- the Housing Opportunities Through Modernization Act (HOTMA) -- would take major steps toward that goal.
Business
A new report is startling, but also kind of not.
Politics
With policymakers providing the needed funds, state and local housing agencies are restoring many of the housing vouchers lost to the sequestration cuts in recent years. But restoring the rest -- which the President and Congress should prioritize in their fall negotiations over a final 2016 budget -- will likely require relief from sequestration.
Politics
San Antonio Mayor Julian Castro has been nominated to be the next secretary of the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development. What's to be said about this? Well, over at the Washington Post, The Fix hooks you up with "The 10 things you need to know about Julian Castro." This must be a misprint, because the article goes on to relate 10 very inessential and/or inconsequential things about Castro. For example, did you know that he has a twin brother? Or that he does not speak Spanish? Here's a hot scoop: Castro could one day be the first Hispanic president of the United States, according to this one guy who said so once, unless of course someone else becomes the first Hispanic president of the United States. The whole "who will be the first Hispanic president of the United States" thing is really sort of up in the air at the moment.
Impact
For families to have any chance of accessing the middle class, they need to start with a stable home in a strong community.
Politics
The Fair Housing Act has proven to be an effective remedy for many who have been denied the fundamental right to housing. But racial and ethnic minorities still need the protection that aggressive enforcement and more comprehensive education can provide, as do gay and lesbian homeseekers.
Business
In fact, there are examples that suggest the opposite is true: Minnesota and Iowa have two of the highest home ownership
Business
All told, about 90,000 Native families are homeless or under-housed on a given night, and Native communities nationwide face an immediate housing shortfall of 200,000 homes.
Politics
Government actions are rarely race-neutral in their impacts -- unless the government is careful in how implementation is carried out. The sequestration is a particularly blunt instrument, and we fear that it will only serve to exacerbate the racial disparities in housing affordability revealed by this data.
Politics
In this past presidential election, President Obama defeated Governor Romney by a popular vote of 65.9 million to 60.9 million. In a sane world, that would be the end of the story. But the U.S. presidential election uses the Electoral College.
Business
Rising prices encourage new construction, and rising prices encourage some homeowners to sell. The big question for 2013 is whether today's price gains will continue strongly enough to encourage builders to build and homeowners to sell.
Business
The slow recovery has also held back employment, as millions of construction workers, mortgage brokers, electricians and
Business
Homeowners need help avoiding foreclosures, Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac need reform, and complex rules need to be replaced
Business
The Krugman-Estonia kerfuffle raises an interesting question: Has Krugman ever sided with free market economists against government activism in his Times forum?
Education
Reforming discriminatory zoning laws and taking other steps to promote residential and school integration could have potentially large benefits to the nation's future by making educational opportunity more equal.