hovering parents

Although the term was originally used to refer to teens and college age kids, it can be referred to doing tasks of a child of any age when the child is capable of doing it alone. Toddlers and preschoolers for example may not learn to play alone because their parent is always hovering over them and playing alongside of them.
So, when I call my son at his college, the conversations are like this: "Hey, pal. How's classes? Yeah, great. Now look, can you tell me why my phone keeps showing messages from someone who died five years ago?"
Helicopter parents usually have the best intentions -- to protect their children from life's hardships and prepare them for adulthood -- but as with many other aspects of parenting, the results don't always match the intentions.
In our fast-paced and competitive society, the stresses children face by over-ambitious parents often goes unnoticed. On behalf of the millennial generation, below are seven things helicopter parents everywhere need to understand.
We've all heard the term "helicopter mom" to describe moms that are over-protective and overly involved in their children's daily activities. These moms frequently over-stay their welcome and hyper-manage everything.
When Boston was hit by last winter's barrage of blizzards, my two oldest kids, then ages eight and five, spent their snow