how to succeed at work

Ask the right questions and you'll be considered a brainiac.
Here's some advice for your next meeting: Hold thy tongue. Total freedom of speech, new research shows, has the potential to squash creativity. As it turns out, if you're in a group of both men and women, abiding to standards of political correctness can help generate far better ideas.
Picture two co-workers: While one is slightly timid about voicing opinions in meetings and spearheading projects, the other is clearly more ambitious, openly striving for a seat in the corner office someday. Who's the man, and who's the woman?
If you don't have a deep-rooted passion for what you do, you need to find something that inspires you as soon as possible. We invest too much time in work to think otherwise.
It's happened to every woman I know in the workplace. You're in the coffee queue, waiting for the elevator or on your way to a meeting when you're asked a simple question that you often dread.
"There's nothing wrong doing things for other people, it's a good thing, but I think you can lose yourself in it."
Love me or hate me, but I am here to tell you the truth about something that you probably don't want to admit: Each time you worry about how fat you look, you are withdrawing from the opportunity to play on your unique talents and passions.
There's a false notion that success is a zero sum game. To win in our careers we have to give up family. To work hard we have to sacrifice sleep. It's just not the case
Think about how much better we could perform as individuals and teams if we tapped into our own potential, rather than accepting the restrictions we allow others to impose upon us.