Howard Baker

The faux indignation and outrage Republicans are spewing over Democratic opposition to the elevation of Neil Gorsuch to the
But the moment that launched him into the national spotlight came in the summer of 1973 when he was a member of the Senate
This is not addressed to those Republicans who think Donald Trump is an appropriate kind of person to be President of the United States. If you like what you see, go ahead and vote for him.
Little wonder that candidates increasingly do their best to rehearse and rehearse and stick to prepared talking points. However, there are plenty of other opportunities besides the debates for missteps to go viral on the web.
I have a treasure trove of Baker memories, all of which reinforce my sense of Howard Baker as one of the most decent people with whom I have worked. While I was simply a young staffer, he never treated me or my colleagues as anything else but equals.
Joe Biden, Mitch McConnell, Harry Reid, the governor of Tennessee and so many others of high office present listened, but did not speak. And after the twenty one-gun salute, after taps, after everyone left the graveside, there stood the simple casket of the simple man who changed the world.
You never felt Howard Baker was making an argument, or debating you. He always seemed to be calling it as he saw it. That's one of the reasons he had that rare quality -- almost impossible to find in Washington nowadays -- of moral authority. People trusted him.
This was a week of winning, losing, and sometimes winning by losing. On Wednesday, the Obama administration finally won the wide-ranging consensus it's always wanted by losing to a unanimous Supreme Court, which ruled decisively that police must get a warrant to search a cell phone during an arrest. On Thursday we all lost, as former Senate Majority Leader Howard Baker passed away. Known as "the Great Conciliator," he was a symbol of a more moderate -- and more effective -- Republican Party. In the World Cup, Uruguayan star Luis Suarez avoided using his hands, but not his teeth. For his toddler-worthy meltdown he was banned nine matches and given a four-month time-out. Meanwhile, the U.S. won by losing, advancing to the knockout stage of the tournament even while losing to Germany, thanks to Portugal beating Ghana. The U.S. fell only one goal short of remaining unbeaten, but, unlike Italy, they at least remained unbitten.
While you ponder whether to join John Boehner's lawsuit, take our Week to Week news quiz to see who else is mad at the week's newsmakers.
For CNN and Fox News, the race seems to be not who got it first, but who got it worst with the Supreme Court ruling.