HuffPost Aspen Institute

If USA Field Hockey wants to be inclusive and truly grow the game, there are "millions" of youth ready to be introduced.
Earlier this month, USA Field Hockey fielded an Olympic team in Rio filled with members heavily connected to the Southeastern Pennsylvania area.
In the wake of the presidential nominating conventions in Cleveland and Philadelphia, it is clear we are facing serious fractures
The next President should continue this bipartisan tradition and realize the promise of full-time service by putting AmeriCorps, the Peace Corps, and YouthBuild on a growth trajectory, and incentivizing public agencies, higher education institutions, and nonprofit organizations to create new positions that will enable every young person who wants to serve a year the chance to do so.
A key sanction Harvard has adopted in its opposition to single-sex final clubs is to deny their members endorsements for Rhodes Scholarships and other fellowships requiring the University's imprimatur.
Similar to the glass ceiling, the concrete ceiling is a barrier for success. The difference between the two terms is that the concrete ceiling is a term specifically made for women of color.
I am 19 years old and I have never felt safe in a school bathroom. I am a queer student at the University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill, and I am represented by a state government that doesn't seem to care about the safety of people like me.
Today, youth in America are making strides to change the world around them. From powerful social media movements, to political organizing and protesting on the ground, the voice and passion of young people have convinced society to take us seriously.
I've been hearing the phrase, "It's expensive to be poor," a lot lately. Elite policy circles, academia, and the mainstream press have spilled a lot of ink on it. I even got into the fun a couple of weeks ago, when I was asked by the Aspen Challenge to speak on this very subject.
As a lifelong public servant, Chris Stevens dedicated himself to understanding local cultures in the Middle East and North Africa and building understanding between them and the United States.
I remember when E. D. Hirsch published Cultural Literacy and the controversy sparked by his list of things he believed every American should know. His point was that we must all be ready to move outside our comfort zones and work together to make progress.
Americans, both new and old, are faced with a challenge. We must make a common culture that mirrors our new America -- an America where "us" is no longer "white" by default, where the population has never been more diverse, where our role in the world is shifting rapidly.
We need a better system that ensures workers have the stability and security they need, without stifling innovation or undermining the flexibility the on-demand economy offers.
Community colleges need to assess labor market outcomes, the end of completion. Economic research and data firms like EMSI and Burning Glass are supporting this effort taking the college's value-add assessment to a new level.
But what if the next place where innovation would spring from is not a physical place, but an entire segment of our economy? I'm talking about the non-profit sector.
The political power of groups battling discrimination can only be magnified through unity. The children of Charlotte's undocumented workers have been raised as Americans, attended American schools and know the history of the civil rights movement in their communities.
Volunteering remains strong across the nation, with 62.8 million Americans (1-in-4 adults) giving their time to an organization, donating 7.96 billion hours that valued at nearly $184 billion in 2014.
With growing urgency and a lot of bottom-up action around the world, a solid and effective global agreement is needed at the UN Climate Change Conference in Paris, which opened today, to keep the momentum going, and to achieve the necessary goals to slow global warming.
I remember the first sight of my dad in the airport. Once he saw us, he started running until we all embraced. Even though I was only a few years old, it's a moment that will be ingrained in my mind forever.