human genome

Disorders like depression and ADHD may be genetically linked to personality traits.
Such innovative approaches could make a huge difference to the way medical research is conducted, but they do largely rely on a suitable quantity of data to operate. So it's interesting to see the launch of Canadian genomics company DNAstack recently.
It may be true that we have entered the age of personal genomics, but we have only just scratched the surface.
Your brother recently died of a rare form of cancer. You know that he had been participating in a study on the genetics of this cancer, and that as part of the study, researchers promised that they would send him his individual results.
If you were adopted, you might have a hard time answering questions about medical history at the doctor's office. Family
Scientists say ancient bed-hopping has left a mark on the human genome.
Our Genomes2People research program has a complementary research focus. Our work is in "small data," focusing on rigorously
To prepare for that revolutionary leap, we need to draft software experts immediately who can leverage advances in cloud computing and machine learning while protecting patient privacy to start building open-source tools that will enable scientists to make major inroads on cancer.
Last week, I invited the venerable Lee Hood to speak to us at Harvard Medical School, and I was reminded again of his prescience in describing and advocating for "P4 Medicine" -- or predictive, preventive, personalized and participatory medicine -- over 10 years ago, in 2004!
Futurists are predicting that genomic sequencing will profoundly disrupt the practice of medicine! But from the stethoscope to the x-ray, medicine has successfully integrated new technologies before. Will this be different?
After reading a comprehensive report on their own personal genome, consumers reported knowing less about genetics than they did before. Wait, what? How could that be?
We are sequencing the world -- from ourselves to all of the organisms upon which we depend as a living planet. In the future, our planetary genome might include new life forms built in the lab; there is even talk of the possibility of a resurrected Neanderthal, carried by a surrogate human mother. Science fiction? Not anymore.
An interview with genome and synthetic life scientist J. Craig Venter.
Health care and medicine is living through a major transformation. We're entering into a new era of medicine where prevention precedes treatment.
My mother in-law used to say "If you worry you die, if you don't worry you die, so why worry." None of her offspring are worriers either. Is it because they learned from an early age that worry is such a total waste of time? Or could it be that they are 'warriors' rather than 'worriers'?
What do we need in health care? Fewer people who get ill in the first place. When they do, they should receive better care, tailored to who they are and the specifics of their disease, delivered at a lower cost. The challenges notwithstanding, we moved a step closer to this fantastic vision for health care in 2014.