Humanitarian intervention

The cynicism Americans feel about humanitarian intervention makes sense. But we must stand in solidarity with Syrians.
The violence here was not ethnic; the rebels were motivated by a range of motivations, ranging from patriotic - e.g. Arab
Both before and during the aerial bombardment of Taleban strongholds, I conducted phone interviews in Dari with fixed line
Photo: Bada, Kako, 3 years old, and other displaced children in the village of Tagal, Lake Chad region, Chad. UNICEF/UN028762
A few lessons emerged from the convening, including one from the disability rights movement: "nothing about us without us
In the bad old days of the Cold War, the left and the right used to play a nasty game called "Who's Your Favorite Dictator?" But the terms of the game have changed.
The more active America's foreign policy, the more the U.S. has to spend on the military: the "defense" budget is the price of Washington's foreign policy. American military personnel and contractors die. Enemies are created. A national security state develops.
The Road to Iraq is a work of tremendous intellectual diligence and moral seriousness.
With counseling and psychosocial support, young lives devastated by war and childhoods violently taken away can be reclaimed. We see it happen when they begin to smile again, laugh again, and play again.
In times past, talk of "humanitarian intervention" brought to mind images of Red Cross trucks and nurses coming to the scene of a natural disaster to tend the afflicted.
We must learn from responses to such epidemics in the past if we are to succeed today. Such lessons will be difficult to craft, requiring expertise in culture as well as medicine, but need to be integral parts of our global response.
As of this week, Ebola is killing 100 people every couple days in West Africa. But the true impact of the crisis in West Africa should be measured in the wider impact the disease has wrought. It is not Ebola alone causing the catastrophe in West Africa today -- it is an epidemic of fear.
There seems little doubt that the self-styled radical Islamist group, Islamic State, is committing genocide in Iraq, certainly against the Yazidis, and has targeted Christians to "convert or die" as well.
I have two passions in my life: Helping entrepreneurs find the right franchise or business to buy, and trying to give something
The kidnapping of the Nigerian schoolgirls is a crisis of our humanity. What will become of us if half of humanity is not fully safe, empowered and free? We will all perish. Let us begin to repair the world today.
The humanitarian catastrophe in Syria is one of the greatest of recent decades, but in a world which gets so consumed with constant breaking news and the bombardment of all sorts of information, the electrifying noise of barrel bombs and the real cry for help are not reaching our ears.
Today we confront the fallen world of Syria. Is this House of Cards territory where ambition and revenge battle for supremacy and there is nothing to do but watch the horrors unfold before our eyes? Or do we believe that, despite our own original sins, we Americans can don the white hat and fix things in Syria?
Why has France, which opposed the war in Iraq, suddenly taken up the mantle of humanitarianism? Is it guilt motivating France's latest bout of humanitarian interventionism? Or is the French government just more humane than ours? Actually, none of the above.
In the past week, what started as a political confrontation in South Sudan has descended into serious violence with the potential for mass atrocities. But continued fighting and civil war is not inevitable.
Many have noted the lack of clear strategic interests in CAR. So why did the White House choose to intervene? And why this particular way? What is the likelihood of successfully improving the humanitarian situation? Is there a risk of mission creep?