Hunter-Gatherers

Environmentalists encourage us to cut down on meat consumption in favor of vegetable foods that are less damaging to the environment. Given that our ancestors likely had plenty of meat in their diet, is going meatless a good idea?
We grew a bigger brain and became human when we started eating meat. And looking at the animal-to-plant ratios in the hunter-gatherer tribes we derived from, the probability is high that we're supposed to eat A LOT of it.
Next time you feel inept, just read this.
The findings challenge our understanding of the roots of conflict.
In an interview for Business Insider, astronomer and former director of the Center for SETI Research Jill Tarter, responded to Stephen Hawking's concerns about Active SETI, or sending messages to possible extraterrestrial civilizations rather than simply waiting and listening for signals from said intelligent aliens.
How many of us have wondered, to paraphrase Ursula Le Guin, why we huddle about the campfire? A recent study poses an answer to this question by looking at what hunter-gatherers talk about as they sit around the fire at night.
Last Saturday night at Stanford University, I had the honor of publicly debating the world's leading anarcho-primitivist philosopher John Zerzan. As a transhumanist, I differ from Zerzan on just about every topic.
The concept is this: Humans evolved on a diet very different from today's eating habits. Therefore, the Paleo proponents argue, to be healthier, leaner, stronger and fitter, we must re-think our diet and remove some of the food groups we consider basic.
The domination, killing, destruction, increased work and effort of modern society are not the hallmarks of intelligence, but rather stupidity. How can we use the 10% of our mental capacity more intelligently and effectively? Here are a few ideas:
What did you eat for breakfast this morning? Did you have a bagel or maybe one of those creamy cheese danishes to help you
But not only is it possible, there are healthy, happy societies living on playgrounds right now. Though it's easy to dismiss
Few subjects more predictably animate furious disagreement and cross-purposes discussion than the origins of human warfare. Are people "naturally" belligerent? And what does that even mean? The question taps a deep old well of ideological intuition.
As a society we talk about outsourcing, downsizing, and retraining but not specifically how important is for everyone everywhere to learn some coding skills. The world as a whole is barreling down a path where those who know how to code will own those who don't.
Because women still face so many inequalities and don't have access to as many resources, they suffer the greatest burden. But with this challenge comes an opportunity.
Fourth, Coyne raises an important objection when he asks rhetorically: "Is Apple moral? Is General Motors moral? The questions
Geneticist Spencer Wells spoke to Jon Stewart last night about his new book, "Pandora's Seed: The Unforeseen Cost of Civilization