hurricane katrina recovery

With opinions surrounding Katrina as widely colored and as deeply layered as our king cakes during carnival season, I did my best not to go into the interview series with a predetermined angle or scope for fear of skewing the story through confirmation bias.
The hurricane exposed not only race and class fault lines, but the odious fault lines of heterosexism and faith-based privilege. LGBTQ evacuees, many of whom are now displaced, faced all kinds of discrimination at the hands of many of the faith-based relief agencies.
I spoke with Wendell Pierce - most famous for his HBO series roles in The Wire and Treme - on the closing weekend of Brothers from the Bottom, a critically-acclaimed play about gentrification in New Orleans after the storm, in which Pierce played a lead role both on stage and in production.
Katrina's devastation was, by so many measures, due to the mistakes of people. And the recovery is, by every measure, due to the strength of people.
As the adage goes, "Necessity is the mother of invention." In 2005, on the heels of one of the costliest and deadliest disasters in American history, necessity created opportunity in New Orleans and ushered in a new wave of purpose-driven entrepreneurs who took a fresh approach to the city's challenges: social innovation.
The failure to coordinate services, to plan for the needs of the population, to keep families and neighborhoods together, and to find ways to enable all those who desired to return to New Orleans to do so constitute a third disaster, one like the failure of the levees of human origin.
Most agree that the work to reinvent New Orleans remains unfinished. That's true, especially because post-Katrina New Orleans is trending back toward its old self -- a sluggish regional economy with high inequality and not enough opportunities for its residents. That was certainly not the vision.
"Oprah: Where Are They Now?" followed up with Fannie recently and learned that she still lives in that beautiful house. She
In a city known for boisterous celebrations, there is new reason for optimism in New Orleans this week. More than 2,000 animal protection advocates have descended upon The Big Easy for the Humane Society of the United States' annual Animal Care Expo.
Perhaps one of the most distressing sites is that of the abandoned Six Flags theme park. Inside many of the homes, passersby
This is a broken system. And it will only get worse as extreme weather and sea level rise increase the incidence of events and the levels of destruction.
The unpredictable nature of storms like Sandy and Katrina catch communities off-guard and overwhelm existing support networks of first responders. Recovery and rebuilding takes time and a cadre of committed, full-time boots on the ground.
The city remains incredibly poor, jobs and income vary dramatically by race, rents are up, public transportation is down, traditional public housing is gone, life expectancy differs dramatically by race and place, and most public education has been converted into charter schools.
The Democratic-leaning polling firm, which provided its results to Talking Points Memo, found that 29 percent of Louisiana
The Saints may have lost, but the city of New Orleans did not. It was never just about coming back but about coming back stronger.
I'll never forget Hurricane Katrina -- the mix of a natural and a man-made catastrophe that resulted in the death of over 1,500 of our neighbors. Millions of folks were marked by the tragedy.
Many areas of New Orleans have not completely moved on, but the city is in motion thanks to volunteers and many high profile boosters here in the Hollywood of the South.