i have a dream

One Twitter user pointed out that there is not a single African-American among White House senior staff.
She recalled the 1963 speech King delivered at 16th Street Baptist Church.
I have come to the conclusion that one of the most important roles for higher education is to prepare students to live and work with people who are different from themselves--to make sure that difference is viewed as an enriching experience rather than a threatening one.
As the nation celebrates Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.'s birthday, I'm left to ponder my own existence juxtaposed against his prophetic words on a late August day in 1963.
How quickly we have forgotten that Martin Luther King stood not only head and shoulders above color and class disparity, he became the mountain top. King had a dream and he embodied it. How did he do this?
RALEIGH, N.C. (AP) — Before the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. delivered his famous “I Have a Dream” speech to hundreds of thousands
"We Have a Dream," by Mike Popso. Courtesy Inner State Gallery. "Jimmy and Jalen," by Tom Stoye. Courtesy Inner State Gallery
I first heard Dr. King speak in person at a Spelman College chapel service during my senior year in college. Dr. King was just 31 but he had already gained a national reputation during the successful Montgomery Bus Boycott five years earlier.