I Know Why The Caged Bird Sings

What could be better than bringing your favorite stories — or the ones you don’t even know yet — to life through audiobooks
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A documentary on the lesser known aspects of Angelou's story might be heading to TV soon.
My recent trip to Missouri made me curious about women who changed America with ties to Missouri, so I went looking. Their contributions are varied and fascinating.
While we now refer to Angelou as a renaissance woman, until she published I Know Why The Caged Bird Sings in her 40s, her life resembled what is referred to in ghetto parlance as a hot mess.
Writer, actor, and activist Maya Angelou inspired generations of women with her efforts to overcome discrimination, prejudice and abuse. A woman, who didn't speak for years in her youth, became a voice for millions in her adult life; and that voice was quite lyrical.
Maya, you were more than a master of poetry, you were a master of life -- distilling challenges, circumstances, history, segregation, revolution, loneliness, motherhood, rape, learning, work and life to their essence and escalating them to beauty through art.
Hers was a life born of nothingness, of vicious sexual assault, of shattered boulevards and smashed glass windows. But from the muck of that life, Maya Angelou became a voice for girls, for women, and even for boys like me.
Maya Angelou spent her life as an unstoppable force for art, justice, and love. Her writing touched on themes of struggle
The books that change our lives. It sounds like the dramatic segue into the credits of a soap opera, but it's kind of true right? There are those books that change the way you see the world, a person or yourself that stay with you forever.