ICANN

Cloudflare appears to have ended its relationship with the neo-Nazi website The Daily Stormer.
Americans don't want to accept that 21st-century technological life has to come at the price of total vulnerability to surveillance, nor do they want American technology companies to maintain open global networks at the price of their own personal security. Recent calls for blocking terrorists from posting on social media -- from Hillary Clinton, Sen. Dianne Feinstein, and Google's Eric Schmidt -- reflect a growing American conviction that the state's responsibility to protect its citizens should extend to restrictions on cyber speech.
When it comes to practical problems in the digital sphere, individuals and institutions will look for solutions. Unlike most
E-, virtual, online, and net are gradually disappearing: This is the conclusion reached by the prefix monitoring of ongoing UN-based negotiations on global digital policy (negotiations on the 10-year review of WSIS, the World Summit on the Information Society).
The Internet, the greatest invention of our generation -- several generations in fact -- is in many ways a reflection of the American Dream. It's vast and open, unlimited in its potential reach.
Most data is stored by states and businesses. The question of data tracking and reporting by states and business is a current focus of digital policy discussions.
In the coming months, we can expect more curves, as we watch the lines connecting problems and solutions for net neutrality.
It is time for our Internet masters, most of them in the U.S., to acknowledge that a state is not just a counter-terrorism agency or a counter-regulating body. Each state must stand for social peace, public health, education, welfare, protection and prosperity for its citizens and neighbors.
Within the next two weeks, the governing body of the Internet will rule on who gets to operate the new domain .GAY. I'm concerned that this decision is about to go badly for LGBT people.
Obama's speech focused on a free and open Internet within our borders that doesn't speed up or slow down content delivery. What's interesting about Monday's statement is for all its good, it turns the discussion away from a global perspective to a domestic one.