iceberg

“This is what the founders were worried about in the 1790s.”
The village of Innaarsuit fears a devastating tsunami if the mountain of ice plunges into the sea.
One of the last pieces of the chunk known as B-15 is cracking up.
"It’s the biggest one I ever seen around here.”
Traveling to Antarctica captures part of your soul and drops you in a majestic, serene, unlivable and harsh world where you
Fortunately, a few days ago, the cruise ship, Crystal Serenity, docked safely in New York having passed through the Northwest Passage, the first ever by a traditional cruise ship without an ice-strengthened hull.
"People say, 'Why do you have to be such a disruptive pain in the ass?' And it's not just the punk history I'm coming from
Thousands of tourists gathered in Argentina for a glimpse of a rare and spectacular sight.
But one penguin researcher says they may have just relocated.
In my entire life I have never breathed in purer air, drank cleaner water or felt so naturally energized.
My Inuit guide Maurice is not free today but his brother Alan turns up astride the tracked metal beast, and I ensconce myself atop a plastic ice-cooler at the back of a sled behind a little on-board hut-type contraption.
Breathtaking vistas, natural wonders and fabulous people (so nice, we actually felt guilty at times!) combine to make the island of Newfoundland one of our favorite places on earth.
Filmmaker Alex Cornell went to Antarctica to photograph the landscape, and during his trip he came across a recently flipped iceberg.
Doing in reverse in 40 minutes what it took Mr. Cheltenham and his friend seven days to complete with skis and spiked boots down below, I gain a magnificent bird's eye view of the craggy splendours of Nunavut's Auyuittuq National Park on the flight from Pangnirtung to Qikiqtarjuaq.
It's a glorious sunny day here on the Greenland 'Riviera' in the depths of a February winter, the sky is a pale blue, there's hardly a wisp of cloud, and it's a bracing -8 Fahrenheit, that's -22.222 for those of the Celsius persuasion. Brrrrr!
When Erik the Red landed in Greenland in 982, it took him forever to get here just from near neighbour Iceland, not a mere hour or two, and it's highly unlikely he ever made it up to Kangerlussuaq, let alone further north to Ilulissat, 187 miles beyond the Arctic Circle.
As WWD so accurately points out, the collection pays homage to one of the "cheesiest moments in marketing history, when Looney