idealism

Interviewing is really tiring, so it was at the conclusion of a long day of these sessions when Margaret came in as my last
How can you begin to create paradise in your life? Where is there beauty and wonder you could stop and recognize? Where do you need to disconnect from tasks and reconnect with experience? What viewpoint could be shifted to bring you a bit more bliss?
Material things are created to assist us in our everyday activities and in having the best experiences in life. Such experiences and memories of them are often the primary source of creativity, which significantly shapes the cultural development and can help us reach the stage of self-actualization.
We won't be able to completely escape being victimized by predatory behavior. However, we can take measures that help to avoid unnecessary harm. Here are some tools that can help empower us:
To call health care for all and free college education idealism is to deny realistic possibilities in the service of an ideology that idealizes greed and eschews compassion and courage. It's defeatism and a betrayal of the American way.
That the establishment would fight back against an insurgent populist is no surprise. Indeed, many progressives are reading this as a good thing, a sign that their candidate is authentic. Crowds at Sanders' events continue to grow and Monday in Iowa, despite an unprecedented cold shoulder from the party leadership, he beat expectations.
A conversation between Niall Ferguson and Charlie Rose.
Perfect viewing for any old Tuesday night. The Broken Circle Breakdown is a transcendent meditation on what it means to be alive and where we go when we die. It speaks to the cancer experience without being a cancer movie. I'm not interested in any other kind.
People say that our society has become too sensitive. Donald Trump's comments at the debate seemed to rile even further the political correctness cynics. Just because some hide irresponsibly behind political correctness doesn't mean we should eliminate the practice all together.
There's a category of political intellectuals who proudly proclaim themselves "realists," then proceed to defend and advance a deeply faith-based agenda that centers on the ongoing necessity to prepare for war, including nuclear war.
While we used to feel inspired by our country, we now feel disenchanted. While we used to hope, now we doubt. And rather than listening to leaders who unite us, too often we pay heed to demagogues like Rush Limbaugh whose sole source of profit comes from division and discord.
While I've been a true believer and I've perpetuated the belief in hard work as the great poverty buster, now when I talk to some of them I feel that I've perpetuated a great fraud upon them.
We all live in the common-sense world, trusting in our five senses as if they transmit all reality to us. Yet the quantum revolution, as we've detailed in the last two posts, long ago undermined such a world view.
Reality itself, as explored by cutting-edge theories in physics, cosmology, and neuroscience, is giving us hints that we should look at the world through fresh eyes.
Despite their many divergences, science and philosophy are both led forward by reality. This is inevitable if facts, concepts, axioms, and other mental models are to be reliable.
Bill de Blasio has lifted the left and is a man to watch in 2014. I have a hunch that the next Democratic nominee for president will be watching him closely, too.
In a previous post, where I contrasted the views of the political "Left" with those of the "Right," I pointed out that both right and left really do claim to hold the same goal: a prosperous and relatively decent life for every human being on the planet. The only real argument seems to be on how to actually achieve it.
I must admit that there are times when it is difficult to keep looking up when we are surrounded by so many challenges that seem insurmountable. We live in a time when technological advances bombard us with information.
When Jesus said "Blessed are the poor (or poor of heart)" he was not praising poverty as such. Quite the contrary: he was warning us that the kingdom of God (or of heaven on earth) would never be realized, much less possessed, by the avaricious or the greedy.