illinois-supreme-court

If Rauner really wants to test the checks and balances of the three-branch government, he'll have a chance in 2018, when
Opinion by Reboot Illinois' Madeleine Doubek That letter? The amendment it mentions, House Joint Resolution Constitutional
The ruling majority of justices in their decision singled out one problem with the proposed amendment that put it in violation
More than 560,000 Illinoisans signed a petition for a constitutional amendment to remove politicians from the process of
Here's video as well as the full text of Rauner's speech. "I've been governor of Illinois for a year and a half now. We've
The main reason the Illinois budget impasse has endured into its 10th month is an appellate court decision from last July
Greenberger, the founder and co-president of the National Women's Law Center, was the first full-time women's rights legal advocate in Washington, D.C. A recognized expert on sex discrimination and the law, her efforts have been pivotal to the passage of legislation protecting the rights of women.
There's nothing mysterious or complicated about the Illinois Constitution's directive on state expenditures. They all must be defined by the General Assembly. Without an appropriation, there is no authority to spend.
Though many public employee unions cheered when the Illinois Supreme Court ruled that the state's 2013 pension reform law is unconstitutional, Scott Reeder of the Illinois News Network said those same unions might be singing a different tune come budget time.
The Illinois Supreme Court delivered their unanimous decision May 8: Illinois' pension reform law, signed by former Gov. Pat Quinn in December 2013, is unconstitutional and cannot stand. Illinois politicians and organizations began to respond right away, some more pleased with the decision than others.
Understandably, retirees and current employees enrolled in the five state pension systems greeted the decision as a victory. And for them it is. Really, though, there are no winners here. This year, just shy of 20 cents of every dollar in state taxes you pay goes toward pensions.
The three Republican justices on the Illinois Supreme Court appeared to be the biggest skeptics of the state's case in the Illinois pension reform lawsuit. That's not what most observers expected as both sides presented their arguments to the seven members of the court.
The seven justices have been tasked with judging whether or not the state's failing pension systems can be saved by adopting the 2013 pension reform law. The law, which would dial back some of Illinois' public pension system benefits, was found unconstitutional in a lower court. Now, the highest court in the state will have its say.
Illinois faces a major pension-funding problem. The state's Supreme Court is set to hear a case over whether or not a proposed reform, Senate Bill 1, is constitutional. Here are three things you should remember when thinking about the state's pension crisis.
You have the right to remain silent. You have the right to an attorney. And in Illinois, you have the right to record police officers. By all means, exercise your right to record. Keep the cameras rolling. Our democracy depends on it.
Growing up on the south side of Chicago, Gwendolyn Brooks read and wrote as a child. Her first poem was published when she was 14 years old. She attended college but could not find suitable work during the Depression
The Illinois Supreme Court got it right today when it ruled that juveniles are eligible for new sentences.
Burge has been said to have friends in high places. In an era where the Illinois Supreme Court and the legislature are potentially scaling back the hard-earned pensions of law-abiding public workers and their families, it will be telling to see, once again, just how high Burge's clout reaches in this scandal-within-a-scandal.
A former president of the Chinese American Bar Association, Liu credits the efforts of earlier Illinois Asian-Americans, who broke professional barriers, for laying the foundation of her ascension to the Illinois appellate court.
The financial future of Illinois very soon will be in the hands of the Illinois Supreme Court. Will they side with the unions who will sue over the pension reform bill or the (mostly) Democrats who passed it?