impatience

Originally posted on the RRCB Pastor's Blog As we cry "O Come Emmanuel!" we must also hold tight to our time of patient waiting
Religions and philosophers have long praised the virtue of patience; now researchers are starting to do so as well.
Today I had a fight with God when I was driving in my car. Well, I don't really call God God anymore, now that I no longer follow a traditional religious path, so in reality, I yelled at God-Universe-Higher-Power-Guardian-Angel (and yes, I'm still trying out different names).
I have been challenged in countless ways during this season of healing, and yet the greatest obstacle of all has been waiting.
I have lost my ability to be patient. I KNEW that even though the turkey had "popped," it couldn't possibly be ready yet. So, instead of trusting my gut, I relied on a piece of plastic and rushed the rest of the meal.
Here are the top 30 things that make me crazy when I'm trying to talk to people. I'll bet most of them drive you crazy, too.
We all spend a lot of time waiting in lines -- way more than we'd like. But what if we're waiting for something new and exciting? Doesn't waiting for new purchases become a positive experience, where we actually savor the anticipation so much that it trumps our impatience? Well, yes and no.
In fact, according to computer scientist Ramesh Sitaraman, Internet users may be a particularly impatient bunch. His research
The meaning of patience has changed over time, but that hasn’t made it any easier to practice. There is a bar of marzipan
I left the message in the "Drafts" folder and within a day or two, found I felt absolutely no need to reply to the email. All that steam had evaporated; I didn't care.
You're a work in progress. Self-forgiveness helps you cultivate compassion, kindness and peace. Better still, as you let frustration and resentment go, you'll find the patience and the drive you need to move ever closer to your goals.
If I'm truly present, then I'm experiencing the bliss of the moment. There isn't any anywhere to go but this very moment. There's nothing to wait for. It's in this moment that I can take action steps toward my goal, and if I'm present in this moment, each action step can be filled with joy and peace.
When you can shift into a cognitive mode, and become aware of what's happening to you and questioning the source, as opposed to getting caught up in an anger-fueled rage, you're far more likely to calm that emotion, and less likely to make a decision you'll regret.
Remember that many of life's miracles often do not happen quickly; they require patience. Illnesses and wounds heal best with patience. Life often reveals its mysteries with patience. Difficult problems sometimes solve themselves with patience. We grow into healthy, functioning adults with patience.
We don't have to be victims of hurry sickness. We do have all the time we need -- and from this patient mind zone, we can reclaim our time, our priorities and our ability to respond well to life and all its demands. With patience, we're in the driver's seat of our own lives.