in-home-caregiving

November is National Family Caregivers Month, a time to offer gratitude to those who step in to care for their loved ones when they need it most. It is work that requires a great deal of self-sacrifice, and it often goes unnoticed. In November we take time to recognize family caregivers for the role they play in protecting the independence and dignity of so many Americans.
If you've noticed that your parent has become frail and in need of care, then you've probably noticed something else ... this care is really crazy expensive!
The domestic worker industry has traditionally been difficult to organize and advocate for, given the isolating nature of
And I don't know about you, but I want to keep my loved ones in their homes as long as possible. Let's start to change the way we think about caregiving in a way that doesn't force one to sacrifice her (and hopefully his!) own health to help others.
While little can be done to lighten or remove the feelings of loss and sadness at seeing a life partner suffering due to illness, we can help to ease the daily burden of care by encouraging older couples to accept the services available to them.
Medicare covers a wide variety of intermittent in-home health care services (usually up to 28 hours per week) to beneficiaries if you meet their specific requirements. Here's how it works.
"As the home care business has changed over the years, the law hasn't changed to keep up," Obama said. "Even though workers
Providing therapy in the home can be a rewarding and valuable experience, building wonderful relationships between families and therapists that can last for years. Just remember to establish rules from the start and get everyone involved.
One of the few constants with dementia is change. Levels of memory loss and general awareness can fluctuate greatly.
When a client or a loved one has dementia, all activities of daily living (ADL) -- such as bathing, dressing, eating and sleeping -- need to be understood through the lens of the progressive brain disorder.