income equality

Regardless of politics or personal belief, we must take seriously the "work" in "working class."
You mentioned in an interview that a profound experience in Africa was what led you to pursue mission driven work. Can you
There is a solution for debt: growing the economy, cutting military spending (200% of our annual debt) and raising taxes
I recently had the opportunity to hear jazz bassist Victor Wooten play at a club in my hometown, Oakland, California. His
Calls for greater equality are all the rage among many candidates for the highest office in the land. For Lawrence Lessig, a widely admired advocate for campaign finance reform who just threw his hat in the ring, "citizen equality" is what matters.
Recently, Phyllis Schlafly emerged from her 1950s time capsule with both hot glue guns blazing. She took aim at the issue of income inequality and the proposed legislation to address the problem.
Our state of affairs goes against a pinnacle of American justice, equality before law, facilitating everything from war crimes, to torture, to domestic spying, to a predatory, ravenous Wall Street that feeds on the middle class with impunity.
Spreading the message of empowering Americans and making government functional would seem like an easy task. But when 78 million more people want to watch a corporate football game instead of the game of the politics of running a country, it's an uphill battle for Rep. Lee, or anyone that wants Washington to actually become more functional, no matter the party.
While we live in a very modern world, with plenty of opportunities and open doors for all types of people, women continue to earn less than men. From Yemen to Ireland, gender pay discrimination still exists, no matter which way you look at it.
Incomes for the bottom 90 percent of Americans only grew by $59 on average between 1966 and 2011 (when you adjust those incomes for inflation), according to an analysis by Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist David Cay Johnston for Tax Analysts. During the same period, the average income for the top 10 percent of Americans rose by $116,071, Johnston found.
Another day, another mind-blowing fact about the staggering difference between the haves and the have-nots. To put that into
Thursday was International Women's Day, and like always, there was some guy saying, "Why isn't there an International Men's Day? Yuk, yuk." And while the usual response is, "Every day is a men's day, you asshole," maybe it's time to agree.
With few exceptions, the wealth disparity is growing steadily. What is new though is that within developed economies -- among them are some of the strongest globally -- the wealth gap is widening too.
The rational distrust of tens of millions of people for an innovation economy that requires ever-higher levels of public investment for not-so-democratically distributed economic benefit bolsters Tea Party refusals of any kind of public action. It is now trapping the country in a devolutionary spiral.
During all my adult years living in the USA, I had enjoyed American service, without linking it to servitude. But why do we need to be served so deferentially?
The estate tax is not about confiscating wealth for redistribution, but about encouraging spending during a wealthy individual's lifetime and limiting the intergenerational transfer of wealth.