independent bookstores

Years ago, while raising my three children and taking numerous writing courses, my reading tastes were along the lines of
The first time I set foot in "Bluestockings," I felt a rush of late 70's nostalgia. I instantly recalled the first gay bookstore I visited when I lived in Philadelphia, a clean, airy space, named "Giovanni's Room" after one of the titles of the iconic African-American gay writer, James Baldwin.
There are fewer and fewer bookstores and I fear that a decline in their numbers will mean a little less love in the world. (Even if you think you love Amazon.com, let's be honest, you're just settling for a cheap version of the real thing. Don't you deserve better?)
When Lia, a baby girl in an immigrant Hmong family in central California, started having seizures, it was clear to her American
I took a long time to get on board with the whole Kindle thing but once I did, I was all in. Yet I love my neighborhood bookstore (they serve wine!) and I try to patronize them as much as possible.
Then someone - we think it was former Billings mayor Chuck Tooley, who is quite the instigator - spoke the word "cooperative
Traditional bookstores offer a sanctuary to those of us searching to immerse ourselves in a new world of subjects or dive deeper into some of our favorite topics. They are local, communal areas designed to connect others to share stories and knowledge.
My brother is making an inventory list for the insurance company. He mentions that he had a $5,000 leather sofa. I remind
Lynn Rosen has viewed the book publishing business from every perspective. She has worked as an editor, literary agent, journalist, and author. I sat down with her to ask her about her latest and maybe bravest endeavor -- independent bookstore owner.
I have a love/hate relationship with Amazon. I'm not alone in this, of course. Publishers dislike Amazon for certain practices