Indian Child Welfare Act

The landmark law, which is being challenged in court, is constitutional and protects the "best interests" of Native children, reads their amicus brief.
Native American children have been removed from their families and communities for generations. Which is why in 1978 Congress passed the Indian Child Welfare Act (or ICWA), a law which sets standards for the placement of Native children in foster or adoptive homes. But now, some non-Native families are challenging the constitutionality of ICWA, posing a grave threat to Native American families and communities across the country.
A 1978 law has been vital for keeping Native American communities together. Now it's in court because non-Native people say it's not fair to them.
Native American children have been removed from their families and communities for generations. Which is why in 1978 Congress passed the Indian Child Welfare Act (or ICWA), a law which sets standards for the placement of Native children in foster or adoptive homes. But now, some non-Native families are challenging the constitutionality of ICWA, posing a grave threat to Native American families and communities across the country.
The end of the federal Indian Child Welfare Act of 1978 will make it easier for non-Native parents to adopt Native American children.
The use of DNA tests to claim “Native American” genes or blood trivializes history.
Congress passed the Indian Child Welfare Act in 1978 in an effort to stop American-Indian families from having their children removed by state and local officials. Yet 36 years later, Indian children in South Dakota are 11 times more likely to be removed from their families and placed in foster care than non-Indian children.
Feelings of disappointment welled up within me as I shook my head in disagreement over the South Carolina Family Court's decision of ruling in favor of the Indian Child Welfare Act of 1978. Who was I to disagree with a judge, a law and the Cherokee Nation?