Indian Point

The wisdom of the CES with ZEC has been verified by no less than the world's greatest climate scientists--including NASA's
An escalating series of problems began with an enhanced inspection of the interior of the Indian Point 2 reactor during a
For the past 23 years, Entergy engineers have tried unsuccessfully to ignore, live with, and then stop a radioactive rain from the Indian Point 2 reactor cavity from falling onto workers inside the massive containment building.
Indian Point's Unit 2 reactor is 42 years old and showing its age. Its operating license expired in 2013. Immediately next
In the time since Clinton left New York to become Secretary of State, Indian Point has become far more dangerous and the supply of energy available to replace it has grown sufficiently to enable its safe and affordable closure. Against this backdrop, when Secretary Clinton was asked recently what to do about Indian Point, she cited her long-standing concerns on plant safety and call for a "careful, thoughtful" approach.
In both Chernobyl and Fukushima, before disaster began to unfold, few imagined that such a catastrophe was possible. In the United States, too, despite the knowledge since 1945 that nuclear power, at war or in peacetime, holds dangers of a stunning sort, the general attitude remains: it can't happen here.
Radioactive water leaked into the groundwater at the upstate Indian Point nuclear power plant, officials said Saturday.
'Green News Report' is heard on many fine radio stations around the country. For additional info on stories we covered today
When Governor Andrew Cuomo decided to ban fracking in New York State in December 2014, New Yorkers thought their worries were over. They were wrong.
On September 23, NYC will host the United Nations Climate Summit, one of the foremost events to address reducing carbon and other greenhouse gas emissions that threaten the quality of life for billions of people. As New York offers a showcase for how to have a vibrant economy and low carbon emissions, it is especially fitting the conference is here.
New York State is prepared to close 40 years of intermittent and costly legal wrangling over the annual destruction of billions of fish by the twin Indian Point nuclear power plants in the productive Hudson River estuary if the plant agrees to shut down during peak spawning and hatching seasons for the river's major fish populations.
The Nuclear Regulatory Commission is investigating possibly major lapses in security at the Indian Point nuclear power plants, including the prospect that criminal elements are using parts of the plants' drills for their own training.
Nader said nuclear power is unnecessary because there are many energy alternatives -- led by solar and wind. It is unsafe because catastrophic accidents can and will happen.
...Indian Point begins to power down? Two months of Nuclear Regulatory Commission hearings on the future of the Indian Point
As the clock ticks down toward Fall relicensing hearings for the Indian Point nuclear power plant, New Yorkers face a stark choice: a risk-prone, unsafe nuclear plant or the chance to become a national leader in the emerging clean energy economy.
The resignation of NRC Chairman Gregory Jackzo puts the issue of nuclear safety smack on the middle of Obama's desk, and then into the presidential race. That's a good thing. 
If the citizens of Vermont can shut Yankee, a dam will be breached and the post-Fukushima power of a rising grassroots tsunami will be made tangible. Solartopia will be that much closer.
After careful review of what is known about the Indian Point power plant, I am and have been of the view that it is dangerous, expensive and unnecessary. Here's why.
Governor Cuomo, the growing movement against fracking will not accept this tired "two bad choices" trick.