Indira Gandhi

"Dalits and Muslims are being told by the ruling party that they cannot be part of India’s vision," said the great-grandson of India's first prime minister.
It's hard to believe now that three decades have rolled by since Prime Minister Indira Gandhi of India was assassinated in her own garden in New Delhi by two Sikh bodyguards. India changed forever on that day.
Gabriel Garcia Marquez, one of the finest writers and journalists, passed away recently. The Nobel laureate, considered one of the finest littérateurs ever, gave the world of journalism some of his finest thoughts.
We all live with the knowledge of an inevitable death -- those of us who near middle age have likely witnessed and experienced that knowledge. And yet, when it comes, it still greets most of us with surprise.
Some are born great, some attain greatness by their own merit, but it is doubtful if greatness can be imposed on anyone one
Disillusionment with the ruling Congress is widespread. Its leadership too seems resigned to not regaining power. All it wants to do is thwart Modi from winning.
India has become disillusioned with its robotic prime minister, Manmohan Singh. Sure, he walks and talks like R2-D2, but with nine years under his belt, he is now the country's third-longest serving premier, behind only the iconic Nehru and his daughter, Indira.
The key to deciphering ensuing events lay perhaps in his return drive from the airport. Arun Nehru, Indira's nephew and Rajiv's
Learn statecraft, Indian Prime Minister Manmohan Singh admonished his own home minister after he did not forewarn the family of a Kashmiri held responsible for an attack on India's Parliament, about his hanging.
An independent team led by an eminent former judge (Tarkunde) reported that injured pilgrims were shot dead by Indian soldiers