individuality

"You are enough - just as you are - at this very moment in time" 1) Sit down with a large sheet of paper and note down your
If there’s one thing that I care deeply about it’s my son’s sense of self.
How often have you heard that T.E.A.M don't have an "I" in it? However, every person brings their own personality style to
I'll be honest. The instinctive part of me as a Mom, the part that wants to protect my children from cruelty, scrutiny, and humiliation of any kind wanted to scream, "TAKE THE COSTUME OFF, BABY! DON'T GO OUT THERE!"
Being a leader is not a title held only by the smartest and the fittest. Sadly most people, especially women, don't see themselves as leaders simply because they don't manage a company, organization or teams of people. However, those same people are parents, partners, volunteers, family members, and friends. All of those roles have a leadership component to them one way or another.
There are too many dangerous misconceptions that shape our view of the so-called perfect relationship. Usually, those misconceptions deal with the stripping of one's individuality in the name of long-lasting coupledom and undeniable romance.
Whatever career you have, at some point you have probably felt the need to differentiate yourself and stand out -- for people to know it is you. For a raise, a new job, to start a company -- there are so many reasons it is important. Whether you have something as physically distinctive as Iris's glasses or a specific view on the world, how do you stand out?
This being true to your whole self -- this individuation -- isn't easy. It takes courage and perseverance, but in the long run it feels better. And for many people, bringing their unique offerings to the world is what gives their life meaning.
Most of my friends don't believe this, but my childhood friends know. Growing up, I was a nerd. I was shy, teacher's pet, valedictorian in elementary school, terrified of boys; and I was most comfortable when I had my nose in a book.
I as guilty of stopping with surface identification as some people are when they just see my blindness and don't go beyond?
To view ourselves in the context of our background, history and the present, is an essential aspect of self-acceptance.
It's time to start capitalizing on our age, millennials. In life, it is important to be aware of your inexperience. But it's equally important to be confident in your potential -- because when you really think about it, our memories, our hopes, our fears and our ideas synthesize so that we may all find our place in this noisy, social world.
Our human communication is broken. It happens every day in organizations where we over-complicate basic information we need to share. We are so busy presenting our perfect mission and vision statements that we have lost sight of the shared purpose that allows people to understand how they can make a contribution at work.
I would like to think I'm black. And at first glance, it's apparent I am. My skin and hair say so. And if anything, I've got a birth certificate that solidifies my heritage. I would like to think I'm black. But sometimes, I'm not sure if others of my race agree.
All my life I've been impressed by my father's accomplishments, but now something funny has happened -- I realize I'm just as impressed by the things he's never done.
I'm a cancer survivor, and during chemotherapy, I lost every strand of hair on my head. When chemo starts, it's not as if every hair on your head falls out simultaneously.
This GPS Guide is part of a series of posts designed to bring you back to balance when you're feeling off course. GPS Guides