industrial-agriculture

As people streamed out of the Kara Walker installation "A Subtlety" on a recent Sunday afternoon to buy an ice cream cone from one of the trucks idling outside the old Domino Sugar Factory on the Williamsburg waterfront, I wondered how many thought about the jarring contradiction...
USDA welcomed in the new year by presenting Dow AgroSciences with a bountiful gift: a virtual green light for the pesticide company's new genetically engineered (GE) corn and soybean seeds. These crops are designed specifically to be used with Dow's infamous herbicide, 2,4-D.
Gifts that we didn't really want, need or -- in some cases -- didn't even know about. Here's my top 10 for 2013. It's just a shame they didn't include a gift receipt...
It's easy to get disheartened when confronted with the overwhelming and often depressing statistics we have about climate change, obesity and food shortage today. But think of the power all of us have to make a change.
Labels do matter -- and what the Stanford analysis brings to the fore is the need for deeper, more comprehensive studies on the infinite shades of gray when it comes to agricultural practices
As I look around my Midwestern countryside at the hundreds of thousands of acres of corn being cut early for silage instead of grain as was intended, it only further irritates my sensibility regarding how we use our land -- as a culture and a society.
Our discussions raised critical questions: How do conventional and organic farming and manufacturing processes impact food quality? What toxins are present in raw and processed products? How does milling and cooking alter nutrient composition?
From the fields of California's Central Valley to the produce aisle of a Michigan Walmart, and lastly, the kitchen of a Brooklyn Applebee's, Tracie McMillan gives a firsthand account of the long hours, lousy wages and difficult conditions that are par for the course in these places.
There is common ground to be found by everyone ranging from vegans to die-hard meat eaters. No one can deny the destructive nature of the force that dominates our food system.