Infinite Jest

Wallace and his work (Infinite Jest in particular) have been formative and dear to me in a way that's difficult to express without sounding disturbed. Wallace's prose is absolutely singular, combining brilliant playful formalism, gleeful trivia and an unabashed devotion to raw sincerity.
There is nothing wrong with not liking the writing of David Foster Wallace, but placing all of his many fans in a bubble of "literary chauvinism" is an unjust and narrow-minded approach to express said dislike.
The End of the Tour is focused on human connection through conversing openly, and considering that the contents of these conversations came directly from two perspicacious writers, it never ceases to fascinate and enlighten.
By 1996, upon the publication of the gargantuan novel Infinite Jest, its author David Foster Wallace was the envy of writers. Touted in exalted ways, praised as brilliant, his work produced an "anxiety of influence" for the literary.
Jason Segel gives a performance of enormous compassion and sensitivity as author David Foster Wallace in The End of the Tour. The film is based on the audiotapes of a four-day marathon interview of Wallace by Rolling Stone reporter David Lipsky, played by Jesse Eisenberg.
Why have we chosen to move further and further away from Wallace’s brilliant work?
While we live in an era where a large portion of the population likely dedicates a vast majority of their leisurely reading time glossing over 140 character snippets from friends, family, and celebrities via Twitter, there is an alternative for brave individuals, the novel.
If F. Scott Fitzgerald was alive today and writing, his income would be roughly half a million dollars a year. In his prime writing days, Fitzgerald was pulling in well over ten thousand dollars a year on short stories alone.
There are certain types of book readers that tend to take it too far. There are times in conversations about novels where the only thing running through the mind is, "Come on, seriously?" or "Oh not this again," or the best of them all, "I wish you didn't know how to read."
David Foster Wallace’s family is not happy with Hollywood’s plans to turn his life into a movie. Funnyman Jason Segel stars