information overload

More Republicans than Democrats report news fatigue, the Pew Research Center says.
When it comes to knowledge, I'm torn. My librarian side wants everyone to read more, but my spiritual side believes moderation is key, and that too much of a good thing is just as unhealthy as nothing at all.
Meanwhile, friends and strangers who have made different choices share moments of their lives online almost constantly, inviting
Having all of the information in the world and not using it is like being a millionaire who never spends a dime. So you get to choose. Will you be a smart information consumer, or will you be frivolous with your time and energy?
It's easy to see how disorganized information can cause chaos or frustration. Individuals and companies today deal with more information inputs than ever before, and at times this abundance of content can be distracting, overwhelming or even trigger anxiety.
In a world inundated with information, data, and content, businesses are facing a demand to implement new, adaptive strategies to mitigate their growing mass of unorganized information.
As someone who has an insatiable desire to know and do everything, I've also come to find three insights particularly helpful. Rather than concrete actions, they serve more as mindsets or perspectives to take on all that is available to us now -- and stay centered on what truly matters to us as individuals.
When have you encountered an awareness of knowing what you do not know and what have you been able to do about it? Have you
Information can be clutter. When we get too much info, we shut down. Because getting information can be addictive, we can
As we think back on the last 75 years, how many Xerox effect cases can you think of? A great many of the new Apple Apps do a bit of that. Perhaps the iPhone itself spawned a whole new market.
In 1784, the philosopher Immanuel Kant wrote down his hope for his age and all those that followed. In a famous essay titled
As the New Year ushers in a time for us to reflect on our past, it also allows us to think about ways to refresh our minds with new, creative ideas.
The world got really complicated all of a sudden. You see it in life and you see it especially at work. While so many great applications exist that simplify life's transactions and advances in technology make a 24/7 layer of connectedness, there is a cost that we have incurred as a result.
Greetings fellow victims of the information apocalypse. It used to be, the goal of Inbox Zero was heroic, but achievable. Alas, that seems like such a long time ago. The rules have changed, and the playing field has changed as well.
Yes, Kim Kardashian broke the web. But she did something good as well. She woke up a small but emerging community of information consumers who don't want her oiled posterior to be the web we leave for our children.
Comedian Ruby Wax joins HuffPost Live to explain why she kept her depression a secret.
While certainly frustrating, this "time-out" did force me to reevaluate my relationship with tech. Frankly, it demands too much of my time and attention, it overshares, and doesn't give space to think.
For the last year, I have been trying to write a blog about my work as a mindfulness coach guiding people through their emotions
Technology use becomes a habit, or even an addiction, when we need to check our devices every few minutes because we are