inherent vice

You almost wish this movie version of the Pynchon novel were a book whose pages you could flip back and forth in at will.
You have all these great monologues in this film. What was it like reading William Monahan's script? William's an amazing
Inherent Vice squanders a strong start in an orgy of wheel-spinning. Perhaps Anderson is indulging himself with one of those lengthy jokes in which the punchline is that there's no punchline.
Based on Pynchon's 2009 novel, "Inherent Vice" follows the misadventures of Larry "Doc" Sportello (Joaquin Phoenix), a private
“Inherent Vice” is light, meandering and nearly airy compared to Anderson's last two quite serious films, “The Master” and
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Making a film is the art of retroactive hypnotism. And there is no greater cinema hypnotist than Paul Thomas Anderson. It's rare to see a movie simultaneously this interesting and this good; this incoherent and this profound; this frustrating and this enjoyable.
I haven't seen a Joaquin Phoenix film since I'm Still Here back in 2010. I was reminded of what a brilliant actor he is. Not only did he bring an innocence to a role that could have been played much darker, but he brought a physical humor to it.
There are films that make you want to run to the bookstore or, in reality, Amazon.com. Any Jane Austen or Dickens adaptation. Atonement. Requiem for a Dream perhaps. Then there is Paul Thomas Anderson's adaptation of Thomas Pynchon's Inherent Vice.
5. "Jackie Brown," directed by Quentin Tarantino (1997) 3. "Repo Man," directed by Alex Cox (1984) It also hails from a time