Institute for Policy Studies

Sanders will give a major speech Thursday. Here's a sneak peek.
Now, we have yet another report coming out of Congress. Early press accounts indicate the proposed remedial legislation will
CEOs contended their corporations are too poor to pay overtime, but on their next quarterly call with shareholders, they'll brag about record profits. In 2013, corporate profits were at their highest level in 85 years. That same year, employee compensation was at its lowest level in 65 years.
One strategy focuses on getting elected officials in local and state governments to adopt minimum wages above the federal level. The other strategy involves putting pressure on major employees -- typically highly visible companies that depend on positive public relations to gain consumers' dollars -- to raise the wages of their employees.
"Held captive." It was how one 13-year-old described the feeling of growing up poor in our wealthy nation, and for more and more Americans living in poverty, this feeling isn't just a metaphor.
It is CEOs, not the working poor, who deserve public scorn for their dependence on government handouts. The parable of Charles Dickens' "A Christmas Carol" springs to mind.
With 2013 breaking historical records regarding greenhouse gas emissions, we have little time to act. Investors get it. It's risky business to continue to invest in fossil fuels. Now it's time for policymakers, prime ministers and presidents to get it as well.
On Monday, Seattle struck a blow against rising inequality when its City Council unanimously adopted a citywide minimum wage of $15 an hour, the highest in the nation. This dramatic change in public policy is partly the result of changes brought about by last November's Seattle municipal elections. But it is also the consequence of years of activism in Seattle and around the country.
Hollywood projects our dreams and fears. In the past our cinematic apocalypses have reflected our obsessions with nuclear holocaust and environmental degradation. We're certainly still worried about those fates -- along with pandemics and zombies -- but gross inequality now competes for our attention.
But this year, a separate study released Sunday by the Institute for Policy Studies, is also noting the colleges with millionaire