International criminal law

Going further back to 2002, South Africa's position has definitely changed. It would be interesting to hear the views of
The following Op-Ed consists of excerpts from my speech at the 23rd annual Canadian International Law Students' Conference
Major General Ongwen was a notoriously brutal top commander who spent his entire adult life in the Lords Resistance Army (LRA) which terrorized communities in Northern Uganda, South Sudan, the Democratic Republic of Congo and the Central African Republic.
The establishment of the SCC is unprecedented in recent years in that the world will now have a hybrid tribunal working in a country where the ICC has already opened investigations.
Born in bloodshed, Bangladesh seeks a justice long overdue. Regrettably, the very judicial body responsible for delivering that justice instead threatens to further deny it.
While its historical significance is evident, the UNWCC can also help today's efforts to hold atrocity criminals accountable. The UNWCC's present-day application is best demonstrated by its potential influence on the work of the International Criminal Court (ICC).
Within a large convention hall in the suburbs of The Hague, The Netherlands, one of the most important matters in international justice is under debate, and sadly, only the most ardent stakeholders are paying attention.
It may come as a surprise to some, but the United Nations-Khmer Rouge Tribunal is working. This hybrid Cambodian-international tribunal is a joint enterprise worthy of strong support.
While the case-by-case circumstances of each conflict always matters, the question remains what standard playbook should the global community employ when confronted with the mass perpetration of international crimes?
In this tenth year of the ICC, it is an appropriate time to take stock of the Court's progress in its primary mission: end impunity through the just rule of law.
There are certain crimes -- be they war crimes or crimes against humanity -- that are illegal, no matter what your position in society or in which nation you reside.
It's to be hoped the Security Council's newfound spine will translate into helping the ICC as it endeavors to respond responsibly to yet another weighty referral.
Today sovereignty can no longer be a free pass to arbitrarily arrest, torture, rape and kill one's own people. The military junta in Burma should be no exception.