international justice

Congo's Jean-Pierre Bemba was found guilty of leading a campaign of rape and murder in neighboring Central African Republic in 2002-03.
Finding dictator Hissène Habré guilty is a win for all oppressed peoples.
The fact that these cases were heard in the same week may be merely coincidental, but it nevertheless sends out a strong signal that commanders who commit or permit atrocities will ultimately be held responsible.
DAKAR, Senegal (AP) -- The bodies came daily. Sometimes 10, sometimes 20 lives lost to torture, malnutrition or sickness
July 17, International Justice Day, is a reminder both of how difficult it is to bring the people responsible for the world's worst crimes to justice and of how crucially important it is not to give up.
The establishment of the SCC is unprecedented in recent years in that the world will now have a hybrid tribunal working in a country where the ICC has already opened investigations.
In 2012, the Obama administration issued a US strategy toward sub-Saharan Africa with a stated objective to promote and protect "human rights, civil society and independent media" as an integral part in strengthening democratic institutions on the African continent.
Witnesses who testify at the International Criminal Court (ICC) against accused war criminals often take great risks to do so. Yet, until now, their voices have been missing from discussions about how the ICC is fulfilling its responsibility to prepare and protect those who testify.
Against a backdrop of criticism by some African leaders of the International Criminal Court's focus on African cases and repeat calls for the African Union to take the lead in prosecutions, this is a groundbreaking development and a policy watershed.
While we may never understand the full truth and be able to right all wrongs, the dangers of the international community standing behind a singular narrative of the genocide can be seen in the ongoing crisis of Rwandan refugees.
It was a little over a year after I won the 2012 Undergraduate Award when I got accepted to the 2014 Clinton Global Initiative University conference. The acceptance came as a surprise. Used to reading books and writing papers, I'd long held the mistaken belief that the so-called start-up culture was an antithesis of academia.
Allowing these war crimes allegations to go unaddressed would undermine important international legal norms while rendering true reconciliation in the country an even more remote prospect.
With its pursuit of the Tibet case, the Spanish courts had sent a strong message to those who oppress with impunity. But it is now looking like Spain may well be out of daring altogether.
The ripple effects of impunity for those who commit or oversee atrocities should not be underestimated. Long after guns go silent, warlords have little trouble finding ways to continue profiteering at the expense of the population.
At 6pm on Thursday, Nov. 7, the Institute's Justice and Society Program will host “Trying Atrocity Crimes: The Khmer Rouge
Since President Putin's election, Russian authorities have intensified their assault on basic freedoms and undermined rule of law. This crackdown should be a matter of grave concern to the United States.
The United Nations, which is supposed to represent the best of our collective aspirations for justice and human rights, yesterday represented the worst.