international medical corps

Global need has rarely been greater. Today, a disparate population of 65 million souls forced to flee armed conflicts and
Mekinda Mekinda Jr. and Marie-Louise Ocran. Photo: Mamadou Dabo. U.N. Ambassador of Timor-Leste Maria Helena Lopes de Jesus
The woman, who asked to be identified only by her first initial, Q, is among an estimated 2,000 people who were briefly trapped
Francis spent two years with his foot tied to a wooden log in a shed. He suffered from psychosis but his family was unable
Like Zahra, Basi's family fled Sinjar and resettled in an unfinished concrete building in Siji. They also did not know what
Hazam, 35, could no longer see a future for himself and his family in Deir al-Zour, a city that has been a flashpoint in the country's five-year-long civil war. A physical fitness teacher, Hazam could no longer work, while his wife was pregnant with their fourth child.
When government health worker Brima Kamara arrived in Pate-Bana, a small town of some 2,000 souls in north-central Sierra Leone, it was eerily quiet, the sun-baked, red dirt streets empty.
Many of them were brought to the nearest Ebola Treatment Unit (ETU), run by International Medical Corps roughly 45 minutes
Guinea was the source of the largest and deadliest Ebola outbreak in history. As the virus cut its deadly path through families, communities and a worried nation, it was aided by unwilling accomplices--rumors, suspicion and misinformation.
Comfort Kollie remembers the day she was discharged from International Medical Corps' Ebola Treatment Unit (ETU) like it was yesterday. "It was a Friday," she says. "Someone came in [to the ETU and asked,] "Where is Comfort? You are Ebola-free today.'"
Facebook users did way more than just “like” inspiring stories coming out of Nepal after it was struck by a magnitude-7.8
If all goes as planned, sometime today the World Health Organization will officially declare Liberia to be free at last of the deadly Ebola virus, having passed through the requisite 42-day window without a single new case of the disease.
Facebook is also capitalizing on its worldwide reach to help users notify one another of their whereabouts in the affected
I sigh with relief. We've lost many patients since opening the ETU almost two weeks ago, but tonight -- my very last night here -- it doesn't look like anyone's going to die.
On the evening of June 23, a middle-aged woman walked into the emergency room of Phebe Hospital with a fever. Located in Bong County in the rural heart of Liberia, Phebe was known as one of the best hospitals in the country.
As I watch the woman seizing in front of me though, I do not feel helplessness, but shame. In many ways, learning how to care for patients with Ebola means unlearning some of my most basic clinical instincts.
The new refugee caseload now joins the Darfur refugees from the east who have lived in Chad for more than 10 years. In looking at the geographic pressures from all sides, Chad prepares to become the Jordan of Africa, the eye of the regional storm.
The bombings alone didn't force Anout and her family to flee their home in a small Syrian town near the border with Iraq. Nor did the missile attacks. Nor the scarcity of food, the closing of all the schools, the loss of electricity. Anout's family -- two boys and three girls -- endured all of it.