international transgender day of remembrance

Whether or not you endorse the statements and behaviors of Ms. Jenner, it must be noted that her celebrity has focused attention on a matter too long ignored.
Today is Transgender day of Remembrance, the annual day memorializing trans people killed in transphobic acts of violence.
The sad truth is, this personal moment is not exclusive to November 20th. I, like many others, live perpetually is a state of fear of the reaction from those who do not support my identity.
In those moments you feel no one cares and no one loves you, remember you are important and we need you to survive. After 25 years in the transgender community, I can assure you it will not always be bad.
Last year I attended my first Transgender Day of Remembrance. My teenage trans daughter had been out only six months, and no matter how much we loved, accepted, and supported her, there seemed to be so much hatred and pain lying in wait beyond our front door. Throughout the entire vigil I wept openly and profusely. So this year I had not planned to attend TDOR.
"In many states, there is still an outdated mindset from times of slavery and civil war, but in time, there will be more
My heart belongs to the ladies on 14th Street who stood with me night after night, trying to survive and just be their authentic selves. I cry today for those ladies who are no longer here with us in 2014, but my heart remembers them.
Today we memorialize and celebrate the lives of those transgender and gender-nonconforming persons who were murdered this past year simply because of their gender identities. We also honor the lives of trans people who ended their own lives because they just could not bear to go on in the face of the emotional and/or physical violence brought about by transphobia.
As we honor our friends and family we have lost to anti-transgender violence on Transgender Day of Remembrance (TDoR), how can we ensure that transgender women of color are leading the LGBTQ anti-violence movement?
Attendance continues to grow, including that of elected leaders. The U.S. Secretary of State himself, John Kerry, issued a statement today. That the trans community has reached that level of political importance is noteworthy, and this increase in importance and exposure feeds on itself.
This summer alone, we saw numerous attacks on trans New Yorkers, including the murder of 21-year-old Islan Nettles in Harlem. We must do more to end this hate.
We celebrate that we are a resilient people, we are a resilient community, we care for one another, we advocate for one another, and we continue to rise up, to live our lives in dignity and truth, and to bring about change in our society.
As much as Transgender Day of Remembrance is a time for memorializing those who have died, this day, this week, this month, this year, this lifetime and beyond need to be committed to ensuring the safety of all who place footprints on the Earth.
It occurs in a month full of and surrounded by relevant observances and seasons: All Saints and All Souls, when we remember the dead; Thanksgiving, when we express gratitude; Advent, when some of us anticipate Word-made-flesh.
In the face of pervasive discrimination, harassment, and violence, Transgender Day of Remembrance is a way for us to show that trans lives are valuable. It is this perceived lack of value that underpins so many of the challenges that those of us in the transgender community face.
Today only two of my 13 closest sisters are alive. I close my eyes and see them standing next to me on the street, proud of who they are and never ashamed of their identity. I applaud my fallen sisters for showing me the way with the grace of God.
Universal human rights are not available à la carte: No one gets to pick and choose who deserves rights and who doesn't. Either everyone has them or they cannot be considered universal. For far too many trans people, the struggle for basic rights has become a matter of life and death.
Since Rita Hester's murder, hundreds of others have been murdered. This year more than 200 people have died at the hand of anti-transgender violence. Every two weeks, on average, someone is murdered in the United States in an act of anti-transgender violence.
In preparation for Transgender Day of Remembrance, those who celebrate and survive may draw from ancient traditions of world cultures that meditate on death as a way that the living can not only mourn but embrace a deeper gratitude for life itself -- both the lives of those lost and our own.
All Saints' Day also marks the first day of Transgender Awareness Month, with its own equivalent annual vigil, the International Transgender Day of Remembrance to commemorate those slain in anti-transgender hate crimes.