internet addiction

In the eternal words of Ferris Bueller,"Life moves pretty fast. If you don't stop [and put your phone down] once in a while, you could miss it."
A seemingly small and barely noticed organizational change in DSM-5 disguises what is really a giant conceptual leap -- one that may eventually cause large and harmful unintended consequences.
If you feel any of these when your calendar starts to fill up or you feel too many demands on you, step away from the computer
The smartphone keeps us on automatic pilot and it inhibits us from making healthy choices, thus we are responding to life on an automated and unconscious neurobiological basis. We socially isolate, are intolerant of boredom, and are always connected somewhere other than where we actually are at the moment.
There are places like reSTART, tucked away in the woods outside a major city known for its inclusion of technology, and there are people like Ryan and Peter. It's safe to say that I will be thinking of them and their recovery, for a long time to come.
Compulsive Internet use has been linked to depression and anxiety.
The Internet is a great tool, but it is also a risky one. We have all fallen victim to the Internet's black hole effect, reemerging hours later to wonder where the day went. We pay in time and peace of mind what we get in "convenience." These are a few reasons why I keep wifi out of my home.
Schools are sending kids to the most distracting medium ever invented. Parents have no way to know if their children are working or playing in one of a dozen windows. An assignment that should take one hour may stretch to two or three.