Internet of Everything

Often referred to as the Internet of Things (IoT) or the Internet of Everything (IoE), our many interconnected devices create a massive online infrastructure many of us use throughout our daily lives. Our smartphones, tablets, laptops, and even refrigerators make up the Internet of Things. In fact, any device which is connected to the internet makes up the Internet of Things.
From plumbers to nurses -- technology will increasingly become part of every job.  As Internet of Things (IoT) devices become more and more ubiquitous in the world around us, it seems only logical that they will begin to affect our jobs and workplaces.
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Just to help everyone else who has the same questions, here is a concise explanation of everything you need to know about the Internet of Things (IoT) and related technologies.
A networked connection of people, process, data, and things is transforming healthcare through developments like electronic health records that are customized and secured for each user, giving patients more information about their own medical care.
It is important to recognize the global success in advancing the adoption of ICTs, particularly telephones and the Internet, around the world. Private sector telecom investment supported by smart government policies fostered infrastructure development to the extent that now over 90% of the world's population is covered by mobile telephone signals.
There is no telling where the next great idea can arise. Providing individuals with multiple pathways and resources to find work or foster ideas that both create jobs and address social challenges can have significant impact. Ultimately, this helps address the unemployment challenge.
What if women in places like India or South America where hospitals and clinics are few and far between but cell phones reach every corner of every village could wear a bra for 12 hours to find breast cancer and the technology wouldn't bankrupt their country?
Solving the unemployment challenge means developing competitive skills, so there are more qualified people eligible for the jobs today and the ones that will be created in the future. To take advantage of the potential of IoE, the world needs millions of people to fill information and communications technology jobs in every country, in almost every field.
As we move into a new economy that values creativity and innovation, we need to reinvent our schools and our communities, where our young people spend more that half their time. Indeed, all of us need places that nurture our creative self.
It's a dark and gloomy night. You walk up a dimly lit path to a door, say "open sesame" and it magically opens. No key. No pass code. Just you and the door. Well, it may not be as simple as that, but the new Kevo Smart Lock from Kwikset ($219) comes pretty close.
Bullish industry estimates suggest that in five years there will be billions of devices connected to the IoT generating trillions of dollars of value for the economy. So why even compare these numbers?
To date, city leaders have not awakened to the challenges and the opportunities before them. But cities must begin. Embracing technology, identifying opportunities, and finding more ways to collaborate at the state, county and city level is key to our nation's success and survival.
Let's be frank. The strength of America's economy and as well as our political prowess in the world are inextricably linked. Cities -- not the Federal government -- are best positioned to renew and reinvent America for the new, global, knowledge-based economy.
Let's be frank. The strength of America's economy and as well as our political prowess in the world are inextricably linked. Cities -- not the Federal government -- are best positioned to renew and reinvent America for the new, global, knowledge-based economy.
Almost 20 years ago, the California Department of Transportation (Caltrans) funded research looking for ways to keep people off the roads.
Beyond the home, as the smart city evolves, we'll have street lamps that only come on when someone is there, traffic systems that dynamically reroute based on what's happening on the roads, buildings that optimize themselves to the number of people and weather conditions - so much is possible.
IoE can deliver both economic value and an improved quality of life. The Internet of Everything can't create happiness by itself, but it certainly can play a large role in enabling it.
SAN JOSE -- Europe will need a workforce trained for careers in the new digitized economy. It is estimated that Europe will have an e-skills gap that, if filled, could lead to 850,000 potential jobs in 2015, rising to twice that by 2020. On a continent where youth unemployment exceeds 50 percent in some countries, there should be no problem finding young and eager people able to do these jobs, provided they receive the proper training.
The city, of all our geopolitical institutions, needs to reinvent itself for this new global age. The FCC decision gives them the incentive.