interreligious-dialogue

In the work of the Interreligious Coordinating Council in Israel, now a part of Rabbis for Human Rights, we have been successful
Regardless if science can provide a more technical, profound and sophisticated understanding of the natural and physical worlds, it cannot judge, evaluate moral or ethical claims because these fall outside the realm of scientific research.
People often ask me if they need to be a Buddhist to practice meditation and Buddha dharma. I tell them, "No, it's not necessary
Many people are very discouraged by the current climate of anti-Muslim and anti-"other" rhetoric that so fills the airwaves. However, the larger reality is that we are progressing as anation towards a more positive appropriation of our rich religious diversity.
Participants agreed that it is not religion per say that causes conflict, but individuals who exploit religion for personal, commercial and political gains. They agreed to return home and pursue the following in the spirit of fraternity.
Opposition to same-sex marriage has never been and should never be a defining mark of what it means to be Hindu.
We, the undersigned persons from the community at Louisville Presbyterian Theological Seminary, denounce the statements made by Donald Trump regarding banning Muslims from the United States.
Our first speaker, The Very Reverend Hosam Elias Naoum, who serves as the Dean of the St. George's Anglican Cathedral in
While there are strengths to hermeneutical approaches when reading the Bible, there are also some weaknesses as well. For
At first glance, the idea of having an interreligious prayer might seem disingenuous and perhaps even insulting; one might ask whether or not the prayer is truly "meaningful": does the language used reflect how one understands their idea and conceptualization of the divine?
There is no question that the document Nostra Aetate ("In our Time") -- promulgated by the Second Vatican Council in October 1965 -- changed the discourse in the field of Jewish-Christian dialogue in particular, and interreligious dialogue in general, in the contemporary period.
Respectful relationships do not insist on sameness of vision or the relinquishing of our distinctive theological commitments. In fact, our differences may be the places of our deepest learning from each other.
Most Jewish students -- and Jewish people in general -- who visit Israel and Jerusalem never meet non-Jews on their visits to Israel. They leave the country without encountering the reality that Jerusalem is holy to Christians and Muslims, as it is for Jews.
These are not great times for Jewish-Muslim relations. In many ways, these are not great times for religion as such. There is so much bad religion around that we sometimes wish it didn't exist. It need not be so. It was not always so. Moments like holy times, such as the month of Ramadan and the concluding Eid el Fitr, are moments when we can imagine alternatives.
Over the past 4 years, 42 Churches, mosques and monasteries were vandalized, attacked or torched in the Holy Land. A very narrow section of the Orthodox Zionist world has engaged in what is in fact religious terrorism.
We are not flawless and the Hindu past is not unblemished. The future of our tradition, however, is not contingent on a perfect past or on immunity to criticism in the present. It depends on its ability to address human problems and to promote the flourishing of all human beings.
Religious diversity presents us with new challenges and opportunities that may be described, broadly, as political and theological. These are interrelated, but, for convenience, we will discuss them separately. Let us consider first, the political.
A missing voice in negotiations between Iran and the P5+1 is that of the global interreligious community. It is astounding that this voice has either been intentionally muted by the American media or, even worse, discredited by our own government as a comparatively unimportant interference in negotiations.
"This is true religiously, and in our positions as minority religions in America," Visotzky told HuffPost. "There are many
Rather than blaming each other, we ought to accept responsibility for each other's fate. All of us as human beings are inextricably intertwined. Instead of blame, let's try a new game: act for peace, and encourage those on the ground in both Israel and Palestine who are doing so.