invisible illness

To dismiss patients' words is akin to throwing away a report from the most sensitive diagnostic technology that has yet to be invented. A little respect and a lot more empathy would go a long way in advancing medical research and practice.
You can be chronically ill and still feel like cracking a smile once in a while.
The point is, I now understand that when you're desperate for pain relief, you'll try just about anything.
Having a seizure is nothing to be embarrassed about. Each of us have a battle we face. It's how we face it that shapes and defines us.
Invisibility presents extraordinary obstacles and risks depending on who is blind to your illness.
It has taught me to appreciate and enjoy real food: I've learned to view food as medicine and fuel. When you think of food
One day she is strong, the next she is not Trying her hardest to take all in her stride Yet behind her fake smile, she must try to hide.
Just because someone looks good today doesn’t mean they look good every day.
I know there are a lot of people like me out there -- people who look "normal" but are suffering from intense pain -- whether physical or emotional. So before you make a sarcastic comment to a stranger on the subway, just remember that you never know what they're going through.
As a young woman battling serious illness, with multiple hidden medical devices, I have found there is a high incident rate of unnecessary, and hurtful comments by those assuming I am not sick. After contacting a small population of disabled individuals on Instagram, it seems there are five specific stigmas that patients desperately wanted dispelled.