Ira Gershwin

I am fond of the 1943 movie, but it does have its problems. The opportunity to finally see the show at City Center's Encores! series last week, ostensibly as it was originally performed in 1940 on Broadway, filled me with anticipation. And trepidation.
Rae Sigman, Carl Sigman's strong-willed mother, was proud of her son's ability to navigate Beethoven sonatas and improvise pop tunes at the piano. But when he turned 21 and declared his intention to make a living as a songwriter, Rae gave him two choices: doctor or lawyer.
Months later, in the spring of 1981, Yip did indeed die. And years later, as I was sitting alone at night in the then-newly
When I was very young Yip once said to me that I was the "bone of his bone and the flesh of his flesh." Naturally, I didn't know then what that meant. Looking back, I think I can now understand it.
In my little town I've seen acclaimed opera productions, Tony-winning plays, great local musicians, singers and actors -- all in a beautifully restored 1936 movie theater, the single best cultural space in Marin, as far as I'm concerned.
These wildly over-existential ponderings were triggered by, of all things, the recently opened, widely celebrated, extravagantly beautiful, production of An American in Paris, which, as so many have been saying, really is great to look at.
Don't get me wrong, there's no problem with being a sex worker, or a wife, or a ballerina, or a heiress if you so choose. But what the female protagonists and antagonists in Gigi and An American in Paris lack is agency in their happily ever afters.
Christopher Wheeldon's choreography for An American in Paris, at the Palace, is so spectacular that you have to forgive anything else wrong with the production--and believe you me, there's plenty to forgive--and I mean plenty.
There are performers and then there's Patti LuPone. The the two-time Tony and two-time Grammy winning superstar has astonished stage, TV and film audiences since the 1970s.
I never knew Vernon Duke but I have been working with him for fifteen years now and I'm delighted to report that we are finally, finally, getting someplace.