iran-protests

Iran's national soccer team has picked up activist torch at World Cup from prominent player Voria Ghafouri.
Protests against the country’s strict dress code and “morality police” continue in the wake of Mahsa Amini’s death.
The full scope of Iran's ongoing unrest remains unclear, as protesters in at least a dozen cities clash with security and paramilitary forces.
The death of Mahsa Amini, who had been picked up for her allegedly loose headscarf, has triggered daring displays of defiance.
A soccer pitch in the Iranian city of Ahvaz, home to Iran's Arab minority, has emerged as a flashpoint of anti-government protest at a time of rising Arab-Iranian tensions over the status of Shiite Muslim minorities in the Arab world and the crisis in Yemen.
The International Volleyball Federation (FIVB) has warned Iran that it would be stripped of its right to host the 2015 Under-19 men's world volleyball championship if it bans women from attending matches.
The Iranian team's performance so far with its 0:0 draw against Nigeria in its first World Cup match in which it was not defeated in its first tournament game as well as the encounter with Argentina, has spared Mr. Rouhani and his government being blamed for another failure.
Some in the U.S. concluded that at long last, Tehran desires a thaw in its relations with Washington and a normalization. I remain skeptical, hoping they are correct, but unwilling to make that leap for a number of reasons.
The power of hope in Iran cannot be overstated and the electing of Rouhani is a symbol of both the progress that has been made and the progress that is still to come.
Rouhani's landslide victory, his endorsement by reformist leaders barred from running, and the high voter turnout, all signaled the depth of discontent and desire for change among the majority of voters.