iranian elections

It'll be harder for Trump to demonize a country where democratic culture is spreading, says Bani-Sadr.
Iran's president may have been re-elected, but he’ll need to win the supreme leader’s support and get foreign powers to engage with Tehran to be successful.
A clear path for hope in the future has been opened up by these elections. The hard-liners that have isolated Iran and repressed its people are on the wane.
We all know that the Iranian elections will change nothing immediately, but we also know that these elections are the closest that the Iranian public can come to shaping the country's future. The real effects of the elections will be felt in the next few years, when the battle for the next supreme leader starts. What happened in the Iranian elections is thus even more significant than Hassan Rouhani's victory in the presidential elections of 2013.
Iran can still surprise. Voter turnout has surpassed 60 percent. Victory by candidates aligned with President Rouhani already exceeds expectations. This begs the question: What just happened? Perhaps above all else, these elections reflect Iranian society's continued desire to bring about change through gradual evolution rather than radical upheaval.
The app is seen as a "digital protest" in advance of Iran's upcoming elections.
Iranian elections are hardly free or fair by Western standards. But even with limited choices and a heavily securitized environment, the brief presidential campaign is providing an outlet for harsh criticism of the status quo, including topics that are usually banished from public discourse.
Whoever wins the Iranian elections, it is unlikey that Iran will move toward total totalitarianism as some analysts predict. Iranian society does not have the ingredients to evolve into a totalitarian state.
Increasing sanctions coupled with a record of reliance on aggressive language, inflexible positions and the overhanging threat of war have only served to toughen Iranian resolve.
The political paralysis in Tehran will almost certainly hobble the Iranian regime's ability to deal effectively with the
Iranians have not asked for U.S. or other Western support other than a desire that our media continue to report their story.
If we look at this from a logical point of view, the more Khamenei takes on the opposition, the more it could backfire. He
Social media hasn't only given Iranians a way to evade censorship and speak out; it has given them a way to mobilize attacks on Ahmadinejad's coalition, attacks that go beyond rallies.
Full EpisodesPolitical HumorNewt Gingrich Unedited Interview Jon Stewart devoted three segments to the Iranian elections
Mousavi was leading 54-39 in the one poll before the election. Heavy voter turnout favored him. And instead he loses 63% to 34%. That's an absolute joke.
Arianna appeared on CNN along with conservative columnist Tony Blankley to discuss the turbulent Iranian presidential election
Get HuffPost Comedy On Facebook and Twitter! Conan, on the other hand, took shots at Hugh Hefner and his ex-girlfriend, who